Tag Archives: worry

Grass of the Field

Dactylis glomerata, RignaneseJesus teaching on the grass of the field is in Matthew 6:28-30.

In the “Do Not Worry” portion of the Sermon on the Mount, Christ spoke about grass of the field as well as the lilies considered in the last section. Although scholars do not sure where Christ preached the Sermon, on the    northwestern corner of the Sea of Galilee near Capernaum is a gently sloping hillside that is often considered the Sermon site. Possible Christ stood at the bottom of the hillside while his listeners sat in the grass at higher elevations similar to an amphitheater.

In this story Christ told his hearers to consider the lilies and the field grass. The lilies adorned the simple grass in much the same way that colorful robes adorned King Solomon. Solomon’s robes were not as beautiful as the lilies that grew among the grass; the same grass that was here today and tomorrow thrown into the fire. Then, Christ asked his listeners, if God cared enough about field grass to clothe it with beautiful lilies, would not God much more clothe his people? 

Orchard Grass

In Israel there are hundreds of grasses in the local flora. One of the most valuable native grass species is the Dactylis glomerata, also known as orchard grass and cocksfoot. In ancient Israel, this grass grew wild and was used for grazing animals and at times cut for fodder. D. glomerata is native to North Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. It can grow on slopes, in shallow areas, and in very dry soils.  Orchard grass is frost and heat resistant and tolerates shade. The plant is found throughout Israel to include the Mediterranean coastline and extreme deserts. In the Mediterranean Basin, orchard grass has adapted to long, hot, dry summers.Seeds often germinate in three weeks.   

Symbolism: Pasture, Meadow

In the New Testament, the Greek word for grass is chŏrtŏs which comes from a primary word meaning a court, garden, or pasture. In the context of field grass, chŏrtŏs best symbolizes pasture land. Often pastures are called meadows. A meadow is land that is in grass or predominantly in grass. Pastures have important meaning to the ancient Israelites and by extension to Christians today. Jeremiah (50:7) wrote that the Lord was the true pasture of the Israelites; while psalmists sang that the Israelites were the sheep of God’s pasture (Psalm 100:3).  

King David declared that the Lord is our shepherd and makes us lie down in green pastures (Psalm 23:2). Interestingly, sheep only lie down when they feel contented and secure. When sheep feel threatened, they stand up and look around seeking the source of peril. David’s metaphor was that with the Lord as our shepherd, we, his flock, can rest contentedly in verdant meadows. Christ named himself the Good Shepherd and the gate for the sheep (John 10:9-14).  Whoever enters through him will be saved and find pastures. In these pastures, Christians will be safe and they will have a full life.

In the Roanoke Valley of Virginia, spring is here. Grasses have turned green, dogwood trees are blooming, and azalea bushes are laden with pink and white flowers. Looking at them calms my mind. I spend hours looking out my window at the beauty of the spring season. Often, my husband walks into the room, catches me standing in front of the window, and asks what I’m looking at. My answer is always the same – grasses, trees, and flowers. God made this beautiful section of creation just for me and just for anyone else who values it. God clothed these meadows with trees and flowers. 

In  2-3 weeks the dogwood trees will no longer bloom and azalea flowers will die. In several months, meadow grass will turn brown from the effects of reduced moisture and unrelenting sun.  If God is gracious, I will still look out my window; but the beauty of spring will be gone. When I consider spring’s beauty, it is hard to fathom that I am more important to God than spring grasses, blooming trees, and budding flowers. 

Reflection.  David wrote that we will enjoy safe pasture if we trust in the Lord and do good (Psalm 37:3). Do you want safe pastures enough to trust God and do good? Or, are safe pastures not a high priority for you right now?

I love Bible plants along with their symbolism. If you want to learn more about them, read my two books: 1) Rooted in God and 2) God as a Gardener. You can purchase them from my website: Carolyn Roth Ministry at http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com/

Copyright April 30, 2013; carolyn a. roth

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Worry and the Lily of the Fields

?????????????????Jesus talked about lilies as part of the Sermon on the Mountain; see Matthew 6:25-34.

This excerpt is part of Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount.  Jesus was teaching in the synagogues in Galilee, healing disease and sickness in people. News of his teaching spread throughout Syria and large crowds from Galilee, Decapolis, Jerusalem, Judea and the trans-Jordan followed him.   When Jesus saw the large crowds, he went to the mountain side and sat down. Matthew wrote that Jesus’ disciples came to him and he began to teach them (Matthew 5:1-2). Most likely the “them” that Matthew identified in this passage referred to both Jesus’ disciples and the crowds present at that time (Matthew 7:28).

The Sermon on the Mount was Christ’s inaugural address. Christ explained what he expected of members of his kingdom. This address is the standard for Christian life. At the same time, Christians cannot expect to meet these standards in their own power. Christians need a regenerated heart and the Holy Spirit inside them in order to meet Christ’s requirement for kingdom living.

Christ’s example which used lilies of the field was part of the “Do Not Worry” section of the Sermon on the Mount (NIV-SB). Christ began this section by asking his hearers why they worried about clothes.  More than likely Christ was asking why they worried if they would have clothes to wearer rather than which outfit they were going to wear that day. Then, Christ gave the example of the field lilies, saying that King Solomon in his splendor – in all his beautifully-colored, rich garb — was not dressed like one of the lilies.  Christ ended the “Do Not Worry” portion of the Sermon on the Mountain by saying that God knows our need for clothes, food, and drink. If we first seek God’s kingdom and righteousness, then God will give to us everything else we need including clothes.     

When Christ used the example of lilies, he was not referring to the true lily (Lilium candidum) described with Hosea. He was referring to a flower that grew wild and abundant in the fields, was colorful, and known to most people in the crowd. 

The Anemone

The lily of the field that Christ described in the Sermon on the Mount was possibly Anemone coronaria, also known as the crown anemone, Palestine anemone, and windflower. The anemone is indigenous to southern European countries. It grows in every part of Israel from the northern Golan and Hermon area south through central valleys and hills to the far south at Eilat. Anemones are found along the Israel’s Mediterranean coastline. Anemone grows well in full sun to partial shade and average, well-drained soil. The more sun, the more water required for anemone to thrive; however, anemone do not respond well to constantly soggy soil.  Although anemones grow from seeds, they also propagate by forming bulbets or corms.

Symbolism:  Worry   

The Anemone coronaria has been associated with the Trinity, sorrow, and death; however, in the context of the Sermon on the Mountain, Christ is talking about worry.  Three times in the Matthew 6:25-34 passage, Christ told the people not to worry. He identified four things they should not worry about — their life, what they would eat and drink, and what they wear. Christ promised that God knows his children require these basic necessities and will see that they are met.

Later in Matthew, Christ gave his apostles instructions prior to sending them out in pairs to preach and to heal (Matthew 10:5-20). One directive was for the apostles not to worry about what they would say or how to say it when they were arrested and even flogged in the synagogues. In those times God would give the disciples the right words. The Spirit of the Father would speak through them.

Recently, Bruce and I were working in our garden transplanting flowers. After working about 1.5 hours, Bruce walked up a hill carrying a pan of chrysanthemums. I was walking behind him.  Suddenly, he dropped the pan, flailed his arms, and somersaulted backward down the hill dropping off of a rock wall. Immediately, I ran to him and found him unconscious. Our neighbor called 911. In a short time, Bruce was in the Emergency Department of our local hospital.  Initially, I was beyond worried, almost to panic. Then, my spirit became very calm. The calmness was the result of our very Christian neighbors praying for both of us. Later our church family joined these prayers. 

This incident made me realize that I do not have control of my life or my husband’s life. Health alterations can happen in a second. Worrying about basic needs such as food, clothing, and health does not change the need for them.  Worry does nothing but disturb an individual’s peace of mind as the same thoughts and concerns intrude into the mind, hour after hour and day after day. What changes life is taking our worries and anxieties to God in prayer and letting him give us back peace.

Reflection. In the sermon on the Mountain, Christ reassured the people that they were more valuable than birds, flowers, clothes, food, and water. Do you worry incessantly or do you live like you believe Christ’s words?

I love Bible plants along with their symbolism. If you want to learn more about them, read my two books: 1) Rooted in God and 2) God as a Gardener. You can purchase them from my website: Carolyn Roth Ministry at http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com/

Copyright April 17, 2013; carolyn a. roth

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