Tag Archives: Unique

Pumpkins, Uniquely American

The beautiful orange pumpkin of autumn in the United States is the  Cucurbita pepo (L.). Pumpkins are native to North America, where they have been growing for about 5,000 years. Can you imagine the early settlers surprise when they saw this beautiful orange vegetable and learned that it was edible? As an aside: last weekend I went to my cousin’s home in Pennsylvania and had the best pumpkin pie I ever ate. When I compliment my cousin’s wife, she responded that the recipe was her Grandmothers.  Pumpkins remind American’s of traditions, pumpkin pie being one of them.

Although pumpkins did not grow in the Holy Lands, pumpkins are in the Cucurbitaceae family of plants which includes gourds and squashes. These two plant types grew in the Holy Lands. From my last post you know that gourds were present in Israel.

Pumpkins

If you want to grow pumpkins, all you need is pumpkin seeds and space. Pumpkins grow best from seeds. Pumpkin vines can grow up to 20 feet and grow optimally in a field or large space. Recently, I have seen articles on growing plants in containers using a trellis. Because I have not tried this technique, I can’t recommend.

It takes about 100 frost-free days for a pumpkin to reach maturity. When I plant pumpkins (or watermelons), I place it on a plant pedestal so that the pumpkin doesn’t flatten out or turn brown from laying on the ground.

Symbolism: Unique

Pumpkins are native to the United States (my country). I love that pumpkins are uniquely mine (as an American). One definition of unique is “distinct characteristic.” Christians, especially, Christians in the 21st century are unique. Most certainly they should have distinct characteristics the foremost of which is believing that Christ, the son of God, is the Savior of the world. At the same time that I believe in this unique aspect of Christ, I know that many individuals identify themselves as Christians but have not accepted Christ as their Savior.

What in the world am I to do about the dichotomy between people naming themselves “Christian;” yet not experience the real presence of Christ in their lives, of not accepting that they are broken and need a Savior? Every Christian (real Christian) has to answer that question for him/herself. I try to live a life that shows forth my love of Jesus and gratitude for what He did for me. I write about Christianity in my books and blogs. Most days, I don’t think I do enough to really thank Christ for being the unique son of God, coming to earth, and providing a way for my salvation for me.

Reflection: Does your life show any Christian uniqueness; that is, any distinctive characteristic of being in a personal relationship with Christ?   

Copyright 10/09/18; Carolyn Adams Roth