Tag Archives: Rooted in God

What is beauty?

Lonicera sempervirens 'Cedar Lane'

When I received my first Bible, in it was a picture of Christ. He had shoulder-length medium brown hair that was clean and combed, he was beardless, and his complexion was medium. Christ’s expression was serene and thoughtful. Recently on-line, I saw another picture of Christ surrounded by disciples. He was a vigorous, healthy-looking male with neck-length light-brown hair. He was beardless and smiling. In both representative pictures, Christ was attractive.

The Bible describes the reality of Christ this way:
• “As Christ grew and in adulthood, he had no form or majesty that we should look at him, and no beauty that we should desire him” (Isaiah 53:2).
• After the Roman soldiers were finished torturing Christ, “many were astonished at you— his appearance was so marred, beyond human semblance, and his form beyond that of the children of mankind” (Isaiah 52:14).

Coral Honeysuckle

In contrast to the reality of Christ, the coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) is described by all as attractive. It is the 2014 Virginia wildflower of the year. The honey suckle is a twining woody vine that often trails over the ground or climbs other vegetation. When cultivated, gardeners often grow this honeysuckle on trellis to display the beauty of the flowers.

Coral honeysuckle has evergreen leaves and terminal flower clusters. Flowers are produced from early to mid-spring and sporadically thereafter. The corolla is tubular with five fairly equal sized loves. From the outside coral honeysuckle looks deep pink to red; however, the inside is frequently yellow but can be red or orange.

Single flower, Lonicera sempervirens

Coral honeysuckle is famous because it attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Nectar is abundant and has a floral odor. The bright red fruits are attractive to birds such as finches, thrushes and robins. The plant is host to larvae of spring azure butterflies and snowberry clearwing moths.

Native Americans believed the coral honeysuckle had healing properties. They used leaves (dried, smoked, or steeped in water) as a tea to treat asthma, sore throats, and coughs. Chewed leaves were applied to bee stings and supposedly alleviated swelling. Native Americans were aware that in humans honeysuckle berries caused nausea and vomiting.

Application and Reflection

When I saw pictures of the coral honeysuckle and read its attraction to birds and insects, I thought about Christ. Only Christ was not necessarily physically attractive. Because he was fully man, by the end of long days, both he and his clothes smelled like perspiration. He was an itinerant rabbi (teacher). Likely, Christ did not have toilet paper, take a daily shower, or use a tooth brush or dental floss. UGH!

What attracted people of his time to Christ? In those days, 5,000 -7,000 individuals was a large number of folks to go out and listen to even the greatest teacher; but Christ drew this size crowds.

What attracts me to Christ is his message as described in the Bible, but particularly, the gospels. I still cannot comprehend an individual loving me enough to be tortured and die for me. Why would God want to do this? I am indeed a wretched creature and Christ is the Son of God and part of the Trinity.

Reflection: Reflect on Christ’s appearance. Compare it to your ideas of attractiveness.

I love Bible plants along with their symbolism. If you want to learn more about them, read my two books: 1) Rooted in God and 2) God as a Gardener. You can purchase them from my website: Carolyn Roth Ministry at http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com/

Copyright: February 8, 2015, Carolyn A. Roth, all rights reserved.

Robust and Harsh Tolerant

Beard's tongueThis attractive perennial is semi-evergreen and has digitalis plant-like white flowers. Flowers bloom April – June

Described as robust and harsh-tolerant, it grows in wide open prairies, fields, along wood margins, etc. It is native to Canada and the entire eastern U.S. seaboard. This one grew in the Hershey, PA garden.

Penstemon digitalis is commonly called Husker red and beard tongue. I understand the red designation, however, don’t know where the beard tongue came from.

After all that Jesus went through — long days of teaching, heat and sweat, challenges from the religious elite who were supposedly looking for his coming — He can be described as harsh-tolerant. Probably the individuals who know me best, would never term me “harsh tolerant.”  When adversity strikes, my default is to whine. Often, my behavior embarrasses even me.

Reflection: How do you respond to harshness, i.e., criticism, high humidity heat, lack of safety and security? Compare and contrast your behavior with Christ’s behavior.

Resilient Hawthorn

 

In the Bible

The Bible mentions the hawthorn tree only once (Job 30:4). In Job, often Bible translations don’t use the word hawthorn; rather broom tree is used.  One hawthorn trees grow in the Israeli landscape:  Crataegus aronia also known as Crataegus azarolus and commonly called the spiny hawthorn. It is deciduous (not an evergreen) tree . In ancient Israel, it grew on both sides of the Jordan River. Some believe the crown of thorns worn by Christ was made from the hawthorn; but likely the crown of thorns was made from another plant.

Tree characteristics

Crataegus means strong or sharp point in Greek. The Greek name is appropriate because the tree is strong and has thorns (sharp points). In the United States, the primary hawthorn tree is the Crataegus phaenopyrum. We call it the Washington hawthorn. American gardeners love this tree because in spring it has a beautiful cream to white flowers which turn into red berries (about ¼ inch in diameter) in autumn.

Generally, hawthorn berries remain on trees throughout the winter. Birds and squirrels eat them. If any berries are left over in the spring, migrating spring birds finish them.

Another plus for the Washington hawthorn is that in autumn leaves turn copper to scarlet. They are spectacular. Trees are small to medium size and rarely reach over 30 feet in height although the crown spreads up to 30 feet. Washington hawthorn are tough trees which survive through droughts and don’t seem to be bothered by urban pollution. Often, trees are planted closely together to give

privacy. The tree prefers full sun and grows best in an acid to neutral pH. In the U.S., the Washington hawthorns grows readily in plant hardiness zones are 4 – 8.

Thorns and Legends

The downside to the Washington hawthorn is its thorns, particularly if planted in a play area. Alternatively, thorns can assist when the tree is planted to promote privacy. Depending on the variety of hawthorn, the thorns on the tree’s branches, twigs, and even trunks can be straight or curved. Some thorns measure

up to four inches long. Not only can the thorns cause puncture wounds, there have been responsible for bacterial infections and allergic reactions. A United States legend is that Paul Bunyan used a hawthorn tree as a back scratcher because of its thorns.

In our church Bible garden, we have several redbud trees which are aged. I am considering planting the Washington hawthorn when the redbud trees finally succumb to age. The Washington hawthorn is more stable than both a redbud tree and the Bradford pear tree which is a common tree in southwestern Virginia.

Reflection: Resilient, drought tolerant, grows in diverse environments. Does that describe you?

Copyright September 26, 2017; Carolyn Adams Roth. All rights reserved.

Note: Please check out my website: www.CarolynRothMinistry.com for books on Bible plants. Much of the material for this post was from the Arbor Day Foundation and Missouri Botanical Garden.Save

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Caught in a Thicket

Photograph is Chaste tree flower in St. John Lutheran Bible Garden

Bible Reference: Genesis 22:1-19.

Isaac was the son that God promised Abraham and Sarah – the son through whom all the peoples of the earth would be blessed. When Isaac was about 16 years old, God commanded Abraham to take Isaac to the region of Mount Moriah and sacrifice him as a burnt offering.

Abraham didn’t hesitate or question God’s command. Early the next morning, Abraham, Isaac, and two servants started walking toward Mount Moriah. As Abraham and Isaac walked together, Isaac asked his father where the lamb was for the burnt offering. Abraham responded that God would provide the lamb.

When they reached Mount Moriah, Abraham built an altar, arranged wood on it, and bound Isaac on top of the wood. Abraham picked up his knife, prepared to slay Isaac. At the last minute, the angel of the Lord told Abraham to not kill Isaac. The angel commended Abraham for fearing God enough to sacrifice his son.

Abraham looked up and saw a ram caught by the horns in a nearby thicket. The thicket held the ram in place in much the same way that Isaac’s bindings held him on the altar. Just as Isaac didn’t struggle against his bindings, the Bible doesn’t indicate that the ram struggled to loosen its horns from the thicket. The ram was simply there, waiting for Abraham to see it. Abraham killed the ram and offered it as a burnt offering.

What is a Thicket?

Although Abraham, Isaac, and the ram played major roles in this Bible episode, so did the thicket. A thicket is a group of wild shrubs and occasional small trees which grow together to form impenetrable branches and roots. In thickets, trees rarely grow more than 10-20 feet tall. Often shrubs have thorns and vines entangle with them. Trees and shrubs that could have composed the Mount Moriah thicket were the chaste tree, prickly juniper, and myrtle.Chaste Tree Flower

Abraham’s planned sacrifice of Isaac on Mount Moriah was in approximately 2050 B.C. At that time, much of the Judean Mountains including Mount Moriah was tree covered; however, approximately 30-40 years earlier, a natural or manmade disaster (earthquake, flood, or fire) occurred. Thickets grow only in response to disturbances where large trees are destroyed.

In present day Israel, many wild trees and shrubs have been replaced by plants, e.g., flowers and domesticated trees; however, some thickets still grow where cultivated land was abandoned. An example is the Ramat Hanadiv Nature Park northwest of Jerusalem. When we hiked a park trail, we didn’t see a ram; however, cattle foraged the area. It was easy to image one reaching into the thicket for succulent leaves and getting its horns tangled in branches.

For wilderness hikers, a thicket can be a difficult landscape to traverse. Often when experienced hikers encounter a thicket, they don’t enter it; they go around the thicket. Trying to go through a tangled, thorn-infested thicket can result in loss of direction and damage to skin and clothes.

My friend from Texas calls the chaste tree a “Texas lilac” Its if from the Genus,  Vitus. They are perennials and grow all over the Roanoke Valley (plant zones 6 and 7).

Symbolism

The Hebrew word for thicket comes from the word çâbak, which means to entwine in the sense of interwoven branches. In English, entanglement means to wrap or twist together and to ensnare. Often entanglements cause confusion. Imagine the confusing thoughts that Satan brought to Abraham’s mind during the three day walk to Mount Moriah; e. g., “Surely God doesn’t mean for you to sacrifice Isaac? A God that really loved and cared about you would never require you to kill your beloved son.”

In contrast to the ram entangled in the thicket, Abraham didn’t become entangled in Satan’s lies or become confused by his limited understanding of God and the situation. Abraham obeyed God, believing that God would keep his promise and Isaac would be the father of all nations.

Reflection: Think about a time when you were wrapped up, twisted, or entangled in a problem. Did God fit in anywhere? Knowing what you know now, how could you have involved God more?

I love Bible plants along with their symbolism. If you want to learn more about them, read my book God as a Gardener. You can purchase them from my website: Carolyn Roth Ministry at http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com/

Copyright July 21, 2017: Carolyn A. Roth

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Radiant daffodils

I have never read about daffodils in the Bible. Bible writers missed their chance to refer to or identify a beautiful flower. In March, we had about a week of unseasonably warm weather and the daffodils started to bloom across the Roanoke Valley. Daffodils say to all of us:  “see me, it’s spring!” as they give off their radiant yellow color.

The precepts of the Lord are right, giving joy to the heart. The commands of the Lord are radiant, giving light to the eyes. Psalm 19:8 (NIV)

God’s laws were never meant to be burdensome. They were given to us to create life and light. So when we are weary from reading Scripture the problem is not the Bible—it is with our hearts (ouch!!!). Yet this is good news, for the Bible not only exposes our hearts, it can also encourage and even transform our heart. The Scripture will reveal and equip us to work on the attitudes that we all struggle with (adapted from David Whitehead).

Note: the Bible mentions the narcissus; that is a close enough flower to the daffodil.

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Rejected by God

Photograph of a growing barley

Then the Lord said to Cain, “Why are you angry? Why is your face downcast? If you do what is right, will you not be accepted? But if you do not do what is right, sin is crouching at your door; it desires to have you, but you must rule over it.” – Genesis 4:6-7 (NIV)

God rejected Cain’s offering of grain, yet He accepted his brother Abel’s offering of a lamb. It is easy to see why Cain became angry, but that was because God’s preferences contrasted Cain’s inclinations. Yet God loved Cain so much that he tried to reason with Cain. What happens to us when our will is crossed by God’s will in Scripture? Do we get angry as well? Our reactions are more of an indicator of our heart than any inconsistencies on God’s part (David Whitehead).

Millet berries and flower

Disobedience Consequences

 

By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food until you return to the ground, since from it you were taken; for dust you are and to dust you will return.”– Genesis 3:19 (NIV)

Ruling and subduing the earth was given to us before the fall of Adam and Eve, but our rebellion against God turned that work into a drudgery. Now what was created to be satisfying takes a toll upon our body and our mind. Yet even in the curse of toil God gives Adam the perspective that there is more to this life than what we do. In other words, our dignity does not come from our work but from the breath of God that separates us from dust. Our value is far greater than our efforts, and the dust reminds us of a day when our labor will cease and we shall experience peace in a way that we only knew in the Garden of Eden (David Whitehead)

 

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