Tag Archives: Meditation

Thanksgiving Confession

God of all bounty, you have lavished us with good things richly and freely to enjoy. Yet, we have failed to honor you as the source of all these blessings. We speak and act as though our blessings were rooted in our own wise efforts. In mercy, forgive our shameful pride and ingratitude. Fill us with the Spirit of thanksgiving that all we do and say would demonstrate our full and glad acknowledgement that our abundance comes fully from you. Quicken us to give to others freely and gladly, even as you have given to us so plentifully, through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen.

From First Evangelical Presbyterian Church, Roanoke, VA. November 2020

What Motivates You?

The Word of the Lord: Genesis 30.35-40: That same day he removed all the male goats that were streaked or spotted, and all the speckled or spotted female goats (all that had white on them) and all the dark-colored lambs, and he placed them in the care of his sons. Then he put a three-day journey between himself and Jacob, while Jacob continued to tend the rest of Laban’s flocks.

Jacob, however, took fresh-cut branches from poplar, almond and plane trees and made white stripes on them by peeling the bark and exposing the white inner wood of the branches. Then he placed the peeled branches in all the watering troughs, so that they would be directly in front of the flocks when they came to drink.

When the flocks were in heat and came to drink, they mated in front of the branches. And they bore young that were streaked or speckled or spotted. Jacob set apart the young of the flock by themselves, but made the rest face the streaked and dark-colored animals that belonged to Laban. Thus he made separate flocks for himself and did not put them with Laban’s animals.

Meditation: After Rachel gave birth to her first son, Jacob told Laban, he wanted to go back to Canaan; but, he didn’t want to go back empty handed. Jacob wanted wealth in  flocks to accompany his wealth in sons. By this time, Jacob had 11 sons, two wives,  two concubines, and servants. He needed possessions to feed and clothe them.

Jacob was motivated to return to Canaan to see his father and live in the land of his birth. At the same time, Laban, Jacob’s father-in-law was motivated to keep Jacob with him. Laban believed that God blessed Jacob; thus, contributed to Laban’s prosperity.  Both men wanted tangible wealth.  Because Jacob was an Israelite patriarch and because Laban was presented in the Bible as manipulative, most readers support Jacob’s motives and reject Laban’s. In reality, nowhere do we read that either Jacob nor Laban made any, or much, effort to ascertain God’s will.

Jacob knew about God from stories and discussions from his father (Isaac) and possibly his grandfather (Abraham). Yet, despite all of Jacob’s foolish decisions earlier in his life and experiencing Laban’s manipulations, Jacob didn’t turn to God for help. Instead, Jacob attempted to influence the color of sheep and goat using tree branches, to include the popular tree. Jacob’s flock of spotted and striped goats and sheep increased. Most twenty-first century Christians don’t believe that spotted and stripped branches impacted the color of sheep and goats.

Ponder: Ponder your actions when you aren’t sure how to proceed.  Do you pray and ask God to intervene in the situation? Alternatively, are you more prone to attempt to solve the situation on your own? If you pray, are you willing to take the same petition to God more than once? A much-quoted American proverb is “God helps those who help themselves.” That proverb isn’t in the Bible. Instead, the Bible tells us to cast your cares on God because God care for you (1 Peter 5.7).

Action: If you aren’t sure whether or not to pray, or if  persistence in prayer is valuable, read Jesus’ parable of the Unjust Judge (Luke 18.1-8).

Copyright 9/29/2020: Carolyn Adams Roth

Renewal

The Word of the Lord: Genesis 22.9-14: And the two of them went on together. When they reached the place God had told him about, Abraham built an altar there and arranged the wood on it. He bound his son Isaac and laid him on the altar, on top of the wood. Then he reached out his hand and took the knife to slay his son. But the angel of the Lord called out to him from heaven, “Abraham! Abraham!

“Here I am,” he replied. Do not lay a hand on the boy,” he said. “Do not do anything to him. Now I know that you fear God, because you have not withheld from me your son, your only son.”

Abraham looked up and there in a thicket he saw a ram caught by its horns. He went over and took the ram and sacrificed it as a burnt offering instead of his son. So Abraham called that place The Lord Will Provide. And to this day it is said, “On the mountain of the Lord it will be provided.”

Meditation: Normally, Mount Moriah was covered with trees and excluded thickets. Thickets are present only where tall trees have been burnt or otherwise destroyed. The destruction of trees that resulted in growth of the thicket on Mount Moriah most likely occurred because of a natural disaster. Whatever occurred, when Abraham reached Mount Moriah, a thicket was adjacent to where Abraham built a stone altar to God.

An evergreen shrub common to the dry, sandy soil on Mount Moriah is the broom tree. The broom tree symbolizes renewal. With renewal comes a restoration of vigor and freshness; what was faded or disintegrated is made whole.

If anyone needed renewal, it was Abraham. Think about what Abraham endured. When Abraham arrived on Mount Moriah he was exhausted and depressed. By this time, Abraham was 120-130 years-of-age. Some of his stamina was lost. Abraham was heart sick: God wanted him to sacrifice his only heir. Isaac was the son of Abraham and Sarah’s old age. Isaac was supposed to be their reward for following God from Haran to Canaan.

Most of us want so badly to have the kind of faith that Abraham had – faith that God will keep his promises when logic tells us something can’t or won’t happen. Most of us want to be renewed, to be changed from the inside out, i.e., in our heart, mind, and spirit. We want to be different from the society we live in. We want to exhibit Christ in our lives.

One of my firmly held beliefs is that God is aware of my every deep-seated desire. He is pleased when I yearn to be renewed and when you yearn to be renewed. Further, God rewards our yearnings to be renewed in his image.

Reflection: Spend the day pondering ways you need to be renewed. List actions you can take to be renewed in the image of God.

Copyright 9/10/2020, Carolyn Roth Ministry

Going it Alone

Pistacia terebinthus

The Word of the Lord

 Genesis 12.1-7: The Lord had said to Abram, “Go from your country, your people and your father’s household to the land I will show you. I will make you into a great nation, and I will bless you; I will make your name great, and you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, and whoever curses you I will curse; and all peoples on earth will be blessed through you.” So Abram went, as the Lord had told him; and Lot went with him. Abram was seventy-five years old when he set out from Haran. He took his wife, Sarai, his nephew Lot, all the possessions they had accumulated and the people they had acquired in Haran, and they set out for the land of Canaan, and they arrived there. Abram traveled through the land as far as the site of the great tree of Moreh at Shechem. At that time the Canaanites were in the land. The Lord appeared to Abram and said, “To your offspring I will give this land.” So he built an altar there to the Lord, who had appeared to him.

 Meditation

God called Abram to leave Haran and travel to Canaan. There, God promised to make Abram the father of a large nation. Abram didn’t worship God when God called him. In fact, Abram worshiped the gods of the Chaldeans; yet, Abram complied with this strange new God’s direction.

 Abram was approximately 75 years-of-age and childless. He had been married for decades. I believe that part of Abram’s motivation for following God’s direction was God’s promise that Abram would be the father of a nation. This promise implied that Abram would sire at least one son.

When Abram reached Canaan, Abraham stopped at the great tree of Moreh in the vicinity of Shechem. There, Abram offered a sacrifice to God. Some of the underlying motivation for his sacrifice at Moreh could have been Abram telling God, “I’m here in Canaan; now remember your promise.”

Notice, the Bible’s description was of a tree, not trees. Modern-day Bible scholars believe the tree was a terebinth. Normally, the terebinth tree tops out at 33 feet; however, this tree may have been larger than the norm.

In the ancient near East, terebinth trees didn’t grow in groves or groups.  Usually, they grew alone without other trees around them; thus, were seen from far distances and/or used to identify locations. Abram was the first Israelite patriarch. Similar to the terebinth growing alone, Abram and his family traveled to Canaan alone.

One feature of the terebinth tree is its deep root system. Botanists claim that the tree’s deep root system gives it stability. Abram’s root system was God. Abraham was willing to be planted where God wanted him even if he was the only one of his nationality in Canaan.

Reflection: What is your root system? What makes your life stable? Are you rooted in God?

Copyright: 6/18/2020

 

Weary Cedar

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This is a Alaskan Yellow Cedar (Compressus nootkatensis, Pendula). I took the picture at the Botanic Garden in Washington, DC last summer. The branches and needles appear to be sagging, but, this is the trees actual shape. It is receiving the right amount of water.

Some days I just don’t look like I’m sagging, I am sagging! I’m tired and if one more person asks me to do something, I am going to explode. Repeatedly, I ask God if He gets tired. I always get the same answer back, “No, I am not tired; I am God.” Can you imagine a being that never gets tired? Who sees and hears all of us, all the time?

God doesn’t get tired of me talking to him, nor even asking him for things. God wants me to depend on him.

Reflection: It is okay to depend on God; in fact He wants it that way.

I love Bible plants along with their symbolism. If you want to learn more about them, read my two books: 1) Rooted in God and 2) God as a Gardener. You can purchase them from my website: Carolyn Roth Ministry at http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com/

Copyright December 16, 2015; Carolyn A. Roth

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