Tag Archives: Jesus the Christ

Alpha & Omega of Myrrh

Use of myrrh was recorded throughout the Bible. In Genesis (37.25), Joseph was sold to Ishmaelites, who included myrrh in their trade caravan. Esther (2.12) completed a 12-month beauty treatment, which included myrrh, before she was taken to King Xerxes. Myrrh perfumed the robes of a king (Psalm 45.8) and the bed of an adulteress (Proverbs 7.17). Myrrh was catalogued seven times in Song of Songs to describe the Lover, the Maid (Bride), and Solomon’s gardens. In Revelation (18.13), John listed myrrh as a commodity no one would buy after Roman fell.

Despite the various times myrrh was identified in the Bible, three  times stand out:

  1. The earliest is in Exodus. Myrrh was a component of anointing oil used in the tabernacle (Exodus 30.22-33). This same anointing oil was used in the temple in 1st century Jerusalem.
  2. Myrrh was a gift that the wise men brought to Jesus at his birth (Matthew 2.11). There, myrrh symbolized the deity of Jesus; he was the Son of God. Also, myrrh represented “gifts;” God gave his son as a gift to mankind. Thirty-three years after Jesus’s birth, Jesus gave his life as a gift for mankind. In turn, the gift that Jesus wants from each of us is that we belief in him as risen Savior. When we belief in Jesus as Savior, we accept God’s gift of his son and Jesus’s gift of his life.
  3. Myrrh was present at Jesus’s burial. Following the death of Jesus, Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus wrapped Jesus’s body in linen saturated with myrrh and aloes (John 19.39). Then, they laid Jesus’ body in a tomb carved in rock.

Likely New Testament myrrh was from a different plant than in the Old  Testament. Further, different plant species were used to make myrrh in different countries. Most myrrh in the Roman Empire came from the Commiphora myrrha plant; however, in Israel the plant used to make myrrh was the C. abyssinica (C. habessinica, myrrh tree, Arabian myrrh, Yeman myrrh). Probably, the myrrh used by Nicodemus and Joseph was from the C. abyssinica plant. The Hebrew word for myrrh is môr or môwr which means bitter because myrrh had a bitter taste.

The Plant Product

Myrrh is a dried resin from myrrh trees. In present day Israel, pilgrims can view myrrh trees in the Biblical Landscape Reserve. The myrrh plant is a small tree that grows up to twenty feet tall. The trunk (bole) is as tall as thirteen feet. When myrrh resin is harvested, lateral cuts are made on the tree trunk or branches. An aromatic gum resin seeps from the wounds. When exposed to air, gum hardens forming irregular-shaped yellow or brown globules. The globules smell pleasant, but, taste bitter. Today, myrrh is sold by vendors in the bazaar in the old city of Jerusalem. Most the sold myrrh is sharp-edged, marble-size pieces.

Reflection: The Greek word for myrrh is smurna, which translates “strengthened for.” At Jesus’s birth, the Magi brought Jesus a gift that symbolically strengthen him for his life on earth. Considering how Jesus was persecuted on earth, a gift that even symbolically strengthen him was a superlative gift.

Copyright 10/11/2018; Carolyn A. Roth

Pumpkins, Uniquely American

The beautiful orange pumpkin of autumn in the United States is the  Cucurbita pepo (L.). Pumpkins are native to North America, where they have been growing for about 5,000 years. Can you imagine the early settlers surprise when they saw this beautiful orange vegetable and learned that it was edible? As an aside: last weekend I went to my cousin’s home in Pennsylvania and had the best pumpkin pie I ever ate. When I compliment my cousin’s wife, she responded that the recipe was her Grandmothers.  Pumpkins remind American’s of traditions, pumpkin pie being one of them.

Although pumpkins did not grow in the Holy Lands, pumpkins are in the Cucurbitaceae family of plants which includes gourds and squashes. These two plant types grew in the Holy Lands. From my last post you know that gourds were present in Israel.

Pumpkins

If you want to grow pumpkins, all you need is pumpkin seeds and space. Pumpkins grow best from seeds. Pumpkin vines can grow up to 20 feet and grow optimally in a field or large space. Recently, I have seen articles on growing plants in containers using a trellis. Because I have not tried this technique, I can’t recommend.

It takes about 100 frost-free days for a pumpkin to reach maturity. When I plant pumpkins (or watermelons), I place it on a plant pedestal so that the pumpkin doesn’t flatten out or turn brown from laying on the ground.

Symbolism: Unique

Pumpkins are native to the United States (my country). I love that pumpkins are uniquely mine (as an American). One definition of unique is “distinct characteristic.” Christians, especially, Christians in the 21st century are unique. Most certainly they should have distinct characteristics the foremost of which is believing that Christ, the son of God, is the Savior of the world. At the same time that I believe in this unique aspect of Christ, I know that many individuals identify themselves as Christians but have not accepted Christ as their Savior.

What in the world am I to do about the dichotomy between people naming themselves “Christian;” yet not experience the real presence of Christ in their lives, of not accepting that they are broken and need a Savior? Every Christian (real Christian) has to answer that question for him/herself. I try to live a life that shows forth my love of Jesus and gratitude for what He did for me. I write about Christianity in my books and blogs. Most days, I don’t think I do enough to really thank Christ for being the unique son of God, coming to earth, and providing a way for my salvation for me.

Reflection: Does your life show any Christian uniqueness; that is, any distinctive characteristic of being in a personal relationship with Christ?   

Copyright 10/09/18; Carolyn Adams Roth