Tag Archives: God as a Gardener

God’s Plan for Creation

The Word of the Lord

 Genesis 1.9-12: And God said, “Let the water under the sky be gathered to one place, and let dry ground appear.” And it was so. God called the dry ground “land,” and the gathered waters he called “seas.” And God saw that it was good. Then God said, “Let the land produce vegetation: seed-bearing plants and trees on the land that bear fruit with seed in it, according to their various kinds.” And it was so. The land produced vegetation: plants bearing seed according to their kinds and trees bearing fruit with seed in it according to their kinds. And God saw that it was good.

Genesis 1.29: Then God said, “I give you every seed-bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree that has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food.

Genesis 2.5: Now no shrub had yet appeared on the earth and no plant had yet sprung up, for the Lord God had not sent rain on the earth and there was no one to work the ground, but streams came up from the earth and watered the whole surface of the ground.

 Meditation

On day three of creation, God caused the dry land to appear on earth and spoke plants into existence. Plants include trees, shrubs, herbs, bushes, grasses, vines, ferns, mosses, and flowers. God gave plants to mankind for food and beauty.

Initially, there were no plants on the dry land because there was no man to work the ground. God’s earliest plan was for man and plants to interact, i.e., man to tend plants and plants to give food to man.

God intended mankind to have a different relationship with animals than with plants. God gave Adam dominion, supreme authority, or absolute ownership over animals. In contrast, God told Adam to tend, guard, and keep plants. Tending means taking care of, i.e., a caretaker. Guarding is defending against danger and/or destruction.  The archaic meaning of keep is “to protect.”

God entrusted plants and plant growth to mankind. What an awesome responsibility then and now! God’s trust encompasses being good stewards of the land and resources given to us by God.

Think about your feelings when you ponder your garden or the space around your home. God gave you this portion of his creation. You are its custodian. You have a responsibility to tend, guard, and keep the plants in your garden and surroundings.

Many of us, if not most of us, don’t think about responsibility to plants. We barely have time to take care of our children, spouse, home, etc. The notion that God gave us plants to protect, guard, and care for is beyond what we think about, even want to think about; it’s just another responsibility.

Reflection

 Does faithful stewardship of plants include plants in your community? What about in your state, nation, or world?

Copyright: May 30, 2020

Effect of Jealousy

Bible Reading: Genesis 37. 25-28

Jacob’s brothers, most of them sons of Leah and her concubine, were jealous of Jacob’s preference for Joseph, Rachel’s oldest son. Joseph didn’t help matters. He told them of a dream he had in which they all bowed down to him.

Jacob’s sons were tending the herds of sheep and goats in the area of Dothan in central Canaan. Jacob sent Joseph to check on his brothers. When the brothers saw Joseph approaching they discussed killing him but decided that there was no gain or profit in merely killing him. Instead, they decided to sell him to a caravan of Ishmaelite traders taking spices to Egypt. Thus, Joseph went from being a pampered son to a slave in a foreign nation.

There is so much wrong with this story that it is difficult to know where to start.

First, the Ishmaelites were offspring of Ishmael. Ishmael was the son of Abraham and brother to Isaac, Abraham’s son. These Ishmaelites who bought Joseph and planned to resell him in Egypt were his cousins.

Second, Jacob’s sons were half brothers of Joseph. The sons had the same father  (Jacob) as Joseph, despite having distinct mothers. All sons were reared in the same camp; they knew each other, they worked and traveled together from Paddan Aram to Canaan. Most likely at various times, they protected one another.

Third, Joseph’s brothers knew the degradation that often occurred in a slave’s life, particularly one as young and attractive as Joseph. Casual thinking on their part could anticipate that Joseph would be abused, likely sexually.

Four, Jacob’s sons and Joseph’s brothers knew how much their father loved Joseph. They knew how crushed Jacob would be to learn of Joseph’s death. They didn’t empathize with their father’s feelings.

Five, Joseph’s brothers and his cousins were more focused on gain (profit) than blood ties.

Turmeric plant

Turmeric is a product of the plant Curcuma longa, a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant, that has been used as a medicine dating back 4000 years. In Ayurvedic (traditional India) practices, turmeric is believed to have many medicinal properties including enhancing body energy, relieving gas, dispelling worms, improving digestion, regulating menstruation, dissolving gallstones, and relieving arthritis.

In addition to being used in traditional medicine, turmeric is used as a spice and as a component in religious ceremonies.

The root or rhizome is the principal component of the plant. The name turmeric derives from the Latin word terra merita (meritorious earth), referring to the color of ground turmeric, which resembles a mineral pigment. The turmeric plant needs temperatures between 20°C – 30°C (68°F – 86ºF) and a considerable amount of annual rainfall to thrive. Curcuma longa is native to southern India and possibly southeast Asia. The plant doesn’t grow in Canaan or most other parts of the Middle East. When the turmeric rhizome is dried, it can be ground to yellow powder with a bitter, slightly acrid, yet sweet, taste.

Symbolism – Gain, Profit

Jesus asked, “what good is it for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul?” “What can anyone give in exchange for their soul? (Mark 8.36-37).

Joseph’s brothers selling him to Ishmaelites provided them with a profit or gain far less than the worth of the entire world. There may have been 6-8, even 10, brothers present when they sold Joseph to the Ishmaelites. When Joseph’s selling price was divided among the brothers, each would have had little profit from Joseph’s sell. Yet, they lived with their conscience. Possibly, some of the brothers weren’t bothered by their actions, but some could have been. They lived with their deception for decades before they learned that God redeemed Joseph’s life in Egypt.

Reflection

So much of our lives we spend getting educated for jobs and attempting to secure better jobs with more income. Would Christ say these are optimal goals?

Copyright 4/1/2020: Carolyn A. Roth

Idols we live with

People in the United States of America aren’t exempt from paying for sins. We are not in some way better than citizens of ancient Israel. Until the earth is restored and believers are transported to the new heaven, how should we live to avoid being attacked, overrun, and possibly expelled to other countries?

The answers is a two-step process. First, we need to avoid those actions (sins) that caused the ancient Israelites, both Northern Kingdom and Judah, committed. We only have to read the prophet Hosea’s book to realize the perversions of the Northern Kingdom.

The greatest sin of ancient Israelites was idolatry; they worshiped man-made idols. In the United States rarely do individuals set up and worship idols, i.e., Dagon, Buddha,  Moloch. We don’t believe that every country has a god that needs to be appeased and by extension the territory of the United States has a god that must be worshiped.  Although we don’t set up man-made idols in homes, on street corners, or on hill tops, possibly American’s worship idols. Allow me to share my own reflection of idol worship to assist you to possibly understand your own:

Yesterday, my husband told me that an executive was paid (I just can’t write “earned”) sixty-six million dollars a year. Did I momentarily wish I made that amount of money? Yes! It is relatively easy for Americans, including me, who live in a capitalistic economic system, to worship money.  As Bruce and I talked I mentally made a list of items that I wanted (not needed) for my home. Probably, the total cost was about six thousand dollars. I have no need for sixty-six million dollars a year. Candidly, I wouldn’t know how to spend it.

I guess money isn’t my idol but I have other ones, i.e., I want to be a best-selling author. I think that desire would qualify for an idol of fame or prestige. Just to let you know my husband is more sensible than I. He tells me that if my writing leads one person to Jesus, then all my work is worthwhile. I know he is right; but, often I let my ego get in the way of my Christian thought.

Other sins that ancient Israel was guilty of were lying, bribery, stealing, and taking each other to court. The prophet Micah addressed sins of the Northern Kingdom. One of his admonishments is remembered because it told Israel what to do rather than what not to do: To act justly, love kindness, and to walk humbly with God (Micah 6.8).

The second step Americans can take to avoid the Israelite experience of their land being made a waste-land by foreign invaders is found in teachings of Jesus. Jesus is God, Savior, and Redeemer in Christianity. He is my God, Savior, and Redeemer. Is he yours? A summary of what Jesus taught is “Love.” But, if you are like most Americans, you want a “how to” outline to go along with Love. That outline is found in Matthew chapters 5, 6 and 7. This passage is commonly called, “Jesus Sermon on the Mount.” It is the gold standard for individuals to live their life in first century Israel and every century thereafter, even twenty-first century the United States.

Reflection: Because the USA doesn’t have household images or idols set on every street corner or on top of treed hills, doesn’t mean we don’s worship idols. What are your idols. Do you remotely consider that God may punish the USA for the many idols of its residents?

Avoiding Life

“On each side of the river stood the tree of life …. yielding its fruit every month. And the leaves of the tree are for the healing of the nations. No longer will there be any curse” (Revelation 22.1-3 NIV).

 In Genesis chapter three, God cursed the earth to include plants. In this curse, God provided hope to Adam and Eve; that is they would be redeemed. God made no mention of restoration of plants.

When I get to heaven, I want to see flowers—flowering trees, flowering shrubs, and all manner of plants that produce flowers. When I am sad, I look at a plant and my emotions immediately lift. Inside my house, I have flower figurines. Doilies and placemats have flower designs. Even clock faces include flower illustrations. No wonder I look for evidence of plant restoration in the Bible?

At first, I concluded that of 1089 chapters in the Bible, only one (Revelation chapter twenty-two) gave specific information on the restoration of plants in contrast to the many chapters that identified redemption of people. A closer look showed that plant restoration was a theme throughout God’s word.  Plant restoration is tied to the restoration of creation. God promised that: “There will be a time for restoring of all things” (Acts 3.19-21 NIV). “All things” includes plant life. God promised mankind that he will hear them if they confess their sins, will forgive their sin and heal their land (2 Chronicles 7.14 NIV).

Today, God waits for us to confess our sins so he can forgive us and heal the United States of America.

In the new heaven and new earth, plants in chapters two through eight (the bad/harmful plants) will no longer be present, or they will no longer have a harmful component. The Syrian thistle may have its beautiful purple flower, but not harmful spines. Poison hemlock with soft beautiful white flowers will no longer yield poison. No child or pet will become sick, and even die, if they eat lily bulbs thinking they are wild onions.

Gardening Genesis

Colleagues, this is my latest book. It contains 40 meditations on the symbolism of plants in Genesis. As always, the focus is how to live a more productive Christian life. Visit my website: http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com to purchase.

Love Plant

Bible References: Genesis 30.14-16; Song of Songs 7.13.

The Hebrew word dudaim means “love plant.” Dudaim occurred twice in the Bible. By far, the more interesting story was in Genesis. Both Leah and Rachel were wives of Jacob. Jacob had a clear preference for Rachel. At the time of this episode, Leah birthed four sons by Jacob; however, Rachel was barren despite Jacob spending nights with her.

This Bible story began with Leah’s oldest son, Reuben, bringing mandrake roots to his mother, Leah. Rachel saw mandrakes and asked Leah for them. Leah’s response was,  “Wasn’t it enough that you took away my husband? Will you take my son’s mandrakes too?” (Genesis 30.15 NIV). Rachel  proposed a trade: Jacob can spend the night with Leah in return for the mandrakes. Leah agreed.

Many twenty-first century western Christians can’t make sense of this story. What does the mandrake have to do with conception? The answer is that ancient people believed that mandrakes were an aphrodisiac which promoted fertility and conception in barren women. Both Rachel and Leah believed this superstition. Leah wanted additional children to win Jacob’s affection and regard.  Rachel wanted children to validate herself as a woman.

The Song of Songs reference on mandrake is a romantic interlude which occurred  among vineyards. The bride tells her husband: “The mandrakes send out their fragrance, and at our door is every delicacy,  both new and old,  that I have stored up for you, my beloved” (Song of Songs 7.13 NIV). This romantic tryst is filled with beautiful imagery from nature.

The Middle East mandrake was the  Mandragora officinalis. The mandrake is a flowering plant in the nightshade family, related to potatoes, eggplants, and tobacco. The mandrake grows directly on top of the soil, long leaves form a rosette pattern.  Flowers are a delicate purple and have five petals. Flowers emit a gentle, sweet fragrance.

The root is the most notable segment of the mandrake plant, the part associated with fertility and conception. Frequently, the thick root is forked similar to two legs; thus, the root is said to resemble a man. The root can weigh several pounds. Ancients cut the root into an amulet to wear, put it beneath the bed, or consumed very small quantities. If eaten, mandrakes (fruit in particular) can cause dizziness, increased heart rate, distorted vision, and hallucinations. In high doses mandrakes cause death.

Courtesy Sara Gold, Israel.

The Bible story of Rachel, Leah, and mandrakes is important to individuals today. The story demonstrates that Rachel couldn’t manipulate her fertility by using the superstitious power of a plant. When Rachel turned to God, God responded by granting Rachel’s request for a son. What a son Rachel received! Rachel’s first son was Joseph, one of the greatest Bible men and an example for every Jew and Christian.

Reflection: Legonier Ministry29 reminds us: “Many passages of Scripture warn the people of God against sorcery, astrology, and other similar practices (Exodus. 22:18; Revelation 22:15). Most of us probably do not engage in such things, but superstitions remain part of the lives of many Christians. For example, some believers think praying the same prayer every day will guarantee a certain result. Take care to cast all superstitions from your life and trust in the Lord’s sovereign will that is working for your good.”

Wormwood, A bitter herb

Bible References: Deuteronomy 29.18; Jeremiah 9.15, 23.15; Lamentations 3.15, 19; Amos 5.7; Revelation 8.1-11.

When Old Testament authors referred to wormwood, the wrote about bitterness and poison. Most illustrated punishment from God because of Israelites’ behaviors. Old Testament events are presented as lessons for those of us living today. In the New Testament, an episode that named wormwood was a prophecy and called mankind to repentance.  The prophecy described a future sign which would occur near the end of the age.

In Revelation chapter eight, John described a vision in which seven angels, each with a trumpet, stood before God. The angels were ready to sound trumpets, initiating judgments on the earth. The third trumpet signaled a blazing star to fall on  earth. This blazing star was called Wormwood (absinthŏs in  Greek).

My conjecture is that Wormwood will be a meteor from outer space. When meteors enter the earth’s atmosphere and start to burn they are called meteorites. In the United States, children call them “shooting stars.” Most meteorites disintegrate by burning before they hit the earth’s surface.  If a sufficiently-large meteorite enters the earth’s atmosphere and doesn’t disintegrate, it hits the earth’s surface. A huge cloud rises. Dust and particulates in the cloud spread around the globe moved by winds and the rotation of the earth.

According to Revelation, the meteorite Wormwood will contain a contaminate that turns one-third of the earth’s fresh water bitter; or somehow release pollutants from the earth’s crust that contaminates one-third of fresh water sources. Many people will die from the contaminated water. John’s description in Revelation sounds like a nail-biting science-fiction movie.

 

The plant wormwood is one of over 300 species of artemisia; appearance varies from plant-to-plant. The artemisia that grew in Bible Israel is Artemisia arborescens, called the tree wormwood.7 Erect branches can reach ten-feet tall. Leaves have fine hairs on their surface. These hairs are thought to cool and defend the plant. Many artemisia produce cinole which gives them a camphor-like aroma; however, don’t be surprised to find some artemisia smell acrid and unpleasant.28 Artemisia are grown for foliage.

 

With the exception of rue, artemisia is the bitterest herb. The bitter taste is due to thujone content in artemisia. Artemisia leaves flavors stew and sauces; only small quantities of dried or fresh herb is needed. Artemisia leaves are used in tarragon vinegar. A. absinthium is a flavoring in alcoholic liquors, i.e., absinthe, campari, and vermouth. Ancient medicine  used artemisia in scores of concoctions.28

In the Old Testament, often wormwood was used as a metaphor for a) idolatry of Northern Kingdom (Israel),  b) calamity and sorrow, and c) false judgments. The Wormwood star’s name in Revelation identified that its effects were judgment on mankind for idolatry and injustice. Idolatry is blind or excessive devotion to something or someone, i.e., money, prestige and degrees, charismatic individuals, and political parties and ideologies.

The calamity and sorrow associated with contamination of one-third of the world’s freshwater supply will be a consequence of mankind turning from God to idol worship. It is so easy for me to look at others and identify their idols. It is less easy for me to identify my own. Yet, God expects me to continually assess myself and to make adjustments in my thinking and behavior so they are more in line with his.

Reflection: Several times previously in this book, you read how harmful plants were symbols of idolatry. Given the number of times that idolatry appears in the Bible, God takes it seriously. Do you? When did you last assess your thoughts and behaviors to identify man-made idols in your life?

A Diabolical Herb

Bible Reference: Luke 11.42.

Although used by Old Testament Israelites, the herb rue was never mentioned by Old Testament writers. Luke is the only New Testament writer who told a story about Jesus naming rue: “Woe to you Pharisees, because you give God a tenth of your mint, rue and all other kinds of garden herbs; but, you neglect justice and the love of God. You should have practiced the latter without leaving the former undone” (Luke 11.42 NIV).

In Old Testament time, rue grew wild in fields. When Israelites harvested rue, they weren’t required by Levitical law to tithe on it. By the New Testament era, rue grew in home gardens or was bought in markets; thus, growers and sellers were required to tithe on the plant’s value. The tithe on rue was miniscule, which was a point that Jesus was making to Pharisees.

The primary rue species that grew in Israel was Ruta chalepensis know as African rue and fringe rue. When I researched rue, I learned that R. graveolens is the more common rue, grown world-wide to include in the United States.27 Many characteristics of these two species overlap; however, leaves on the graveolens species appear less dense than on the chalepensis species. Some commentators speculated that the group of three rue leaves was the source for the club suit in decks of English and American playing cards.

Rue chalepensis (2)

Rue leaves taste bitter and when bruised smell pungent. Today, rule is primarily grown for ornamental purposes. Rue is rarely used by United States chefs because of its bitter taste. Not only does rue taste bitter, it can lead to gastric pain and vomiting. Individuals who consumed large quantities died. Exposure to common rue, or herbal preparations derived from it, can results in burn-like blisters on skin.

During the Middle Ages, rue was a common ingredient in witchcraft and spell-making. Rue was a sign of recognition among witches. At one time, the Catholic Church used a rue branch to sprinkle holy water on followers; thus, rue was known as the “Herb of Grace.” Historically, rue was regarded as a protective substance. It was an ingredient in mithridate, a substance used in ancient medicine and folklore. Mithridate was an antidote for every poison and a cure for every disease.

The genus name, Ruta, may be derived from “rhutos,” a Greek word meaning “shield” in view of its history as an antidote. Alternatively, Ruta may come from the Latin word meaning bitterness or unpleasantness. The bitter taste of  leaves led to the rue plant being associated with the verb “ruewhich means “to regret.” Pharisees’ teachings were to act as a shield for common citizens of Judea to protect them from any blasphemy against God. Instead, Pharisees’ man-made laws often made the Jews rue or regret their presence in society.

Pharisees missed the point of God’s laws and actions. They had their priorities and their interpretations of God’s laws upside down and inside out. By this time in Jewish history, Pharisees had teachings of Torah and Old Testament prophets. They were aware that God didn’t require 1,000 rams, or 10,000 rivers of oil, or their first-born child as a sacrifice. God wanted men and women to act justly, to extend mercy toward their brothers and sisters, and to love God.

Reflection: Repeatedly, the Bible identified that God is our shield. A shield is defensive armor or someone who protects and defends. Paul instructed Christians to take up the shield of faith, a deep abiding confidence in God. Paul said that with the shield of faith, Christians extinguish the Devil’s flaming arrows.  Name defensive and offensive weapons you have to fight back against  Satan’s fiery darts. If you used each one of these weapons would they be sufficient to protect you from Satan’s wiles and temptations? Any weapons that you don’t need? Name weapons that you need to defend yourself against Satan that God didn’t give you?

To get more information about plants, visit http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com

Aloe can be poisonous

Bible Reference: John 19.38-42.

When I contemplated writing about the aloe plant, I felt warm and comfortable because it is such a familiar plant. Since getting my first job, I’ve kept an aloe plant on the porch in summer and in front of a sunny window in winter. If I burned a finger when cooking or burned my forehead when using my curling iron, I rubbed aloe gel on the burn to take away the sting. Only recently, did I learn that aloe had a poisonous component.

In the Old Testament, aloe (called agarwood) developed from a fungal infection in the eaglewood tree. Agarwood was cut in small pieces and used as a perfume. In the New Testament, most likely the source of aloe was  different than Old Testament agarwood.

After Jesus died by crucifixion, Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus wrapped his body in stripes of linen and seventy-five pounds of mixed aloe and myrrh. Jews used myrrh to cover the smell of the decaying body.  Scholars suggested that because aloes have little odor, aloes were used to “fix,” or hold the scent of myrrh. Aloe gel is moist and slightly sticky. Perhaps, aloe gel “fixed” myrrh crystals in linen cloths and held cloths together and to the deceased’s body.

The New Testament aloe is Aloe vera (A. barbadensis, A. vulgaris, and medicinal aloe). A. vera is a perennial in Israel; however, in my area of the Appalachian Mountains it grows as an annual. When A. vera  is harvested for its medicinal gel, older leaves are harvested because they contain more gel.  The out layers of the leaf feels rubbery and have soft spines on edges.

Aloe has been used in medicine for 3500 years. The first detailed description of aloes is in The Papyrus Ebers, c. 1550 BC. A. vera was used to treat worms and allergies, relieve headaches, soothe chest pains, burns, and skin ulcers, and treat the common cold. Dr. James Duke, head of the US Department of Agriculture, reported than many individuals wrote to him lauding aloe as a remedy for skin cancer.26 Currently, cosmetic companies use aloe in makeup, tissues, moisturizers, soaps, sunscreens, incense, shaving cream, and shampoos. Most cosmetic companies label all products that contain A. vera.

Despite the popularity of aloe, A. vera  has a dark side.  It isn’t widely known that both plants and gel can be poisonous. The poisonous compounds are aloin and anthraquinone c-glycoside. These compounds occur mostly on the inside layer of leaves. When harvesting A. vera gel, cut away the plant skin and retain only the actual gel. Although older plant leaves contain more gel, the inside layer of older plant leaves can be more irritating. This layer causes  contact dermatitis in sensitive individuals. If the aloe plant is eaten, it can cause abdominal cramping, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, and red urine. Thankfully, red urine isn’t due to blood in the urine, but a compound in the aloe. Ensure children and pet companions don’t eat aloe leaves.

Jesus’s body was dead when Joseph and Nicodemus wrapped it in linen-infused myrrh and aloes. Aloes couldn’t heal him or take away the sting of his wounds. The healing aloes in Jesus’s burial cloths exemplified Jesus’s healing of mankind, not himself.

After Jesus’s resurrection some individuals in Judea and throughout the Roman Empire accepted healing from him. They accepted Jesus  as the promised Savior of the world. Many other individuals weren’t willing to be healed by Jesus. Some couldn’t comprehend that a man would die for their sins. Others simply didn’t believe that they were all that bad. Why would someone have to die for their few sins? For still others, it was easier to continue their same religious practices, i.e., make an animal sacrifice or give a little money into an offering box/plate, than to accept a new way of thinking. These individuals wanted to cover over the smell of their sins rather than be healed of those sins. The rationale and rationalizations that individuals used 2000 years ago for not accepting healing from Jesus are the same ones that individuals use today.

Reflection: Do you tend to rationalize your sins? Try to cover them over? Decide that they aren’t too bad? Ignore them? What could you do decrease those sins or better yet eradicate them completely? Contemplate/discuss how sin and obedience to national laws are the same and different to God’s laws.

Cumin – Poison or spice????

Bible References: Matthew 23.1-32; Isaiah 28.24-28.

Matthew is the only gospel writer who recorded the seven “Woes” which were part of Jesus’s teaching in the Temple Courtyard during Holy Week. This day must have been difficult and exhausting for Jesus. Group after group, i.e., Sadducees, Pharisees, lawyers, teachers, and Herodians, came forward to challenge him. They attempted to trip him up so that they could condemn both his answers and him. At one point during challenges, Jesus spoke seven “Woes” in which he condemned both  Pharisees and scribes.

In the fourth “Woe,” Jesus told Pharisees and scribes that they tithe on herbs—mint, dill, and cumin; but, neglect the more important parts of the Law that have to do with justice, mercy, and faithfulness. He advised them to practice justice, mercy, and faithfulness while tithing on herbs. Notice, Jesus didn’t tell Pharisees that tithing on grown herbs was wrong. Just the opposite, Jesus reinforced the need for God’s people to tithe. At the same time, Jesus instructed listeners that loving God and seeking justice were the greater good.

When Jesus identified tithing herbs to Pharisees in Jerusalem, he named cumin (Cuminum cyminum). Cumin was closely aligned with Persian cuisine.  Jerusalemites, many who had ancestors who were returnees from the Babylonian captivity, were familiar with cumin. Ancient Greeks used cumin as a table condiment, similar to the way we use a salt shaker.

Harvesting cumin is time-consuming because it is largely done by hand when seeds turn brown. Seeds are dried, then ground. Supposedly, cumin seeds harvested in the morning are  most pungent.

Cumin is safe when eaten in foods in normal amount. In larger amounts, cumin may slow blood clotting and make bleeding disorders worse. In individuals with diabetes mellitus, cumin can lower blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Cumin consumption isn’t recommended if a woman is pregnant or is breast-feeding a child. Cumin is an essential oil; however, as an oil cumin can cause skin irritation and blisters, spasms, and seizures.

Although Jesus identified cumin in the New Testament, cumin was mentioned in the Old Testament in the Poem of the Plowman (Isaiah 28.24-28). In that poem, Isaiah said that a farmer plows soil, scatters seeds, and threshes crops. Each type of seed, i.e., barley, spelt, caraway, cumin, requires its own type of soil, sowing method, and threshing technique to get an optimal harvest. The order of these three actions comes from God. They can’t be completed in a different sequence and still obtain an optimal harvest.

As I read that God taught farmers millennia ago how to plant and harvest something as small as cumin, I wondered if today God teaches computer programmers how to write detailed software programs, scientists to extend cryogenic science, and engineers to develop nuclear propulsion engines. Isaiah would say, “Yes.” All knowledge comes from God, whether it is planting a crop or engineering a rocket.

It takes about four months to grow cumin plants. If you want the delicious taste of fresh cumin in food, the wait is worth-while. Growing as a Christian, growing in Jesus, is time-consuming. As I look backward over my life, I can see Christian growth. Importantly, I know that I can’t take credit for that growth. God taught farmers how to plant cumin, even though it has the potential to be harmful. God planted me and assists me to grow. Yes, I have the potential to be harmful; but, I also have the potential to be tasty.

Reflection: I have a jar of cumin in my spice cabinet, but rarely use it.  I also have cumin essential oil. This is the first time I realized cumin was potentially dangerous. What in your life is dangerous to your spiritual well-being that here-to-fore you never thought about? Which of your behaviors are dangerous to your country?

To learn more about Bible plants, visit my we website: http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com