Tag Archives: Deer

Grape Hyacinths- Volunteerism

Grape HyacinthThis beautiful little flower is about 2-3 inches tall. It grows from tiny bulbs (culms). In the fall the green leaves come through the soil and stays that way all winter, creating a carpet of green.  Spring (April in southwestern Virginia) brings a plethora of light blue to purple flowers. Flowers are fragrant.

You will notice that some leaves and even some stems look chewed on.  Blame the deer; deer foraged everywhere this winter. Should I be annoyed that deer ate my hyacinth plants? Or should I be happy that I had them available for deer to eat? I don’t know the answer to that question, do you?

Originally, a hyacinth was a precious stone that ancient people called the sapphire. Hyacinthus orientalis is native to the Mediterranean region. I didn’t plant any hyacinth in St. John’s Bible garden, because the hyacinth isn’t mentioned in the Bible; however, they naturalized over winter in the grass in front of church garden beds. Possibly, some tiny bulbs were carried in plants transplanted from home to church.

Symbolism: Volunteerism

That leads me to think about volunteers. If you are a gardener, you are familiar with the word “volunteer” from your garden. Weeds continually volunteer in the church Bible garden plots. When we volunteer, we initiate or take on a task. My husband and I volunteered to plant and maintain the church Bible garden. We get a lot of compliments on it and we even received a national award. But, I have to admit that sometimes volunteering to maintain the church garden just seems like work.

I’s a little worried about my attitude. If I volunteered to plant and maintain the Bible garden, should it seem like work?  Should I resent the time it takes? Or should the gardening be joy? I am going to have to spend time in prayer about my thoughts, emotions, attitude.

Reflection: Do you think carefully of the time involved before you volunteer for an activity? If your volunteer effort something particularly at your church, you should follow through; at least I think you should. Love to read your input.

Copyright: May 5, 2014, Carolyn A. Roth; Updated 3/26/17

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