Tag Archives: CarolynRothMinistry

Consequences of Sin

Book Description: Disobedience has consequences. When ancient Israelites disobeyed God’s statutes, their land was overrun by foreign enemies. They were exiled from their homeland. Prophets attempted to warn them what was going to occur; however, both kings and commoners ignored warnings. Disobedience to God’s laws wasn’t confined to Israelites 2000-3000 years ago. Americans ignore God’s laws and commit the same sins as ancient Israelites, i.e., idolatry, burglary, slavery.  I don’t think that God has one standard and one outcome for Israelites and another for us. This book uses plants to point out the sins of ancient Israel just like ancient prophets used plants to make their point.

What People are Saying:

Dr. Roth tackles this elusive topic courageously confronting the plants most gardeners dread. The result? She rewards curiosity with much to ponder, turning the thorns, thistles, briers, and cohorts into a poignant prickling of conscious and deeper dig into God’s word.” Shelley S. Cramm, God’s Word for Gardeners, NIV Bible

“What a book! Whoever would have thought that meaningful Biblical instruction could be found by examining plant life. Leave it to Dr. Carolyn Roth to research this easily overlooked aspect of biblical teaching and bring to light numerous lessons of Godly living. If you are looking for a truly innovative and interesting way to gain spiritual insight, this book is it.”  John Domalski, Lay Minister, St. John Lutheran Church, Roanoke, VA

Can be purchased on Amazon as a paperback or electronic copy or as a paperback at http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com

 

Autumn in the Mountains

This is a sourwood tree. Amazingly, colored leaves seem to be only on one side.

When I look at this photograph, I see God’s glory in nature. Importantly, we are not to worship nature, but worship the creator-God of nature. Honestly, I do not believe that the beauty we see in nature or in each other are products of evolution. Do you?

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Grape Hyacinths- Volunteerism

Grape HyacinthThis beautiful little flower is about 2-3 inches tall. It grows from tiny bulbs (culms). In the fall the green leaves come through the soil and stays that way all winter, creating a carpet of green.  Spring (April in southwestern Virginia) brings a plethora of light blue to purple flowers. Flowers are fragrant.

You will notice that some leaves and even some stems look chewed on.  Blame the deer; deer foraged everywhere this winter. Should I be annoyed that deer ate my hyacinth plants? Or should I be happy that I had them available for deer to eat? I don’t know the answer to that question, do you?

Originally, a hyacinth was a precious stone that ancient people called the sapphire. Hyacinthus orientalis is native to the Mediterranean region. I didn’t plant any hyacinth in St. John’s Bible garden, because the hyacinth isn’t mentioned in the Bible; however, they naturalized over winter in the grass in front of church garden beds. Possibly, some tiny bulbs were carried in plants transplanted from home to church.

Symbolism: Volunteerism

That leads me to think about volunteers. If you are a gardener, you are familiar with the word “volunteer” from your garden. Weeds continually volunteer in the church Bible garden plots. When we volunteer, we initiate or take on a task. My husband and I volunteered to plant and maintain the church Bible garden. We get a lot of compliments on it and we even received a national award. But, I have to admit that sometimes volunteering to maintain the church garden just seems like work.

I’s a little worried about my attitude. If I volunteered to plant and maintain the Bible garden, should it seem like work?  Should I resent the time it takes? Or should the gardening be joy? I am going to have to spend time in prayer about my thoughts, emotions, attitude.

Reflection: Do you think carefully of the time involved before you volunteer for an activity? If your volunteer effort something particularly at your church, you should follow through; at least I think you should. Love to read your input.

Copyright: May 5, 2014, Carolyn A. Roth; Updated 3/26/17

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