Tag Archives: Carolyn Roth Ministry

False Indigo

Image result for Baptisia

Blue False indigo (Baptisia australis) grows in St. John Lutheran Bible garden. I planted it several places because it doesn’t seem to need a lot of water. Deep-rooted and long-lived, blue false indigo (Baptisia australis) forms a large bush at maturity with clusters of deep blue flowers in late spring.   Flowers change to a brownish pod in late summer-early fall so the plant has interest about 6-7 months of the year.  The native range for false indigo is the eastern United States particularly in zones 3 – 9.  It grows about four feet tall and spreads widely (3-4 feet). Blue indigo is a perennial.

Image result for baptisia australis

The false indigo doesn’t grow naturally in Holy Lands.  So why did I put it in the Church Bible garden? Because it is attractive, interesting, and native. This blog focuses on Bible plants, but I digress occasionally.

Symbolism: Native

A synonym of native is indigenous. Native means belonging to a particular place at birth. At birth I was not native to heaven or even God’s family. I did not belong to Christ. God had to seek me out, to reach out to me. He made me— an alien—his daughter. I became Christ’s sister. I am now one of the family. I belong to God.

I have God living in me in the form of the Holy Spirit. Sometimes I am just tickled pink and feel all warm and fuzzy inside that the Holy Spirit lives in me. At other times I am more cerebral and thoughtful about his presence. At still other times, I forget that He is there and I ignore God.  What a broad spectrum of responses to the Trinity.

Today I went to a funeral. Ira was a 96 year old former minister. He was one of God’s family. He wasn’t born into God’s family; he was not native or indigenous to God’s family. But when Ira accepted Christ he became a family member.

Reflection: Are you a member of the family of God?

Copyright January 24, 2017; Carolyn A. Roth

Please visit my website at http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com/

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Cleansed with Soap Plant

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Bible References:

“Although you wash yourself with soap and use an abundance of cleansing powder, the stain of your guilt is still before me,” declares the Sovereign LORD (Jeremiah 2:22, NIV).

“But who can endure the day of his coming? Who can stand when he appears? For he will be like a refiner’s fire or a launderer’s soap” (Malachi 3:2, NIV).

The context for Malachi’s words on a launderer’s soap was prophecy about the coming Messiah begins with the coming of his messenger (John the Baptist) who would appear before Christ. Messiah’s coming was not warm, gushy and love, love, love. Malachi wrote that Messiah would put individuals on trial (3:5). He would sit as a refiner who removes impurities from precious metals. Messiah would remove impurities from his people’s thoughts and behavior. No longer would people be dirty. Messiah would be like a launder who washed clothes to remove all dirt.

Probably soap was used in some form as far back as prehistoric times. When used with water, soap, reduces the water’s surface tension to attract dirt and oil away from skin or other materials such as clothing.  How?  Soap acts as a “surfactant” which means it helps water to soak in, rather than remain in tight droplets.  Soap works by attaching itself to dirt and suspends the dirt molecule until water rinses it off, carrying away both dirt and soap away from the fabric.salsola-kali-fr-sweeds

Bible women and launders washed clothes with a strong soap, then place the clothing upon a rock and beat them with a stick to remove dirt. Intuitively, it seems to me that launders and house wives would destroy the fibers in clothes if they used strong soap, followed by a rock and a stick; however, in Bible times often cloth was coarser and perhaps more sturdy than the fine fabrics we have today.

The Hebrew word for soap was most often borith, properly a vegetable alkali, obtained from the ashes of certain plants, particularly the Salsola kali (saltwort), which abounds on the shores of the Dead Sea and of the Mediterranean. In early times soap-like substances were extracted from plants such as soapwort, soap root, soap bark, yucca, horsetail, fuschia leaves, and agave. These plants often found flourishing on riverbanks or near lakes.

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Russian Thistle

Russian Thistle (Salsola kali) is an annual plant that can grow to two feet tall. It is in flower from July to   September. Flowers are primarily pollinated by the wind. Salsola kali grows best in sandy soil and medium loam as long as soil is well drained. It grows in very alkaline and saline soils. In the United States it grows in states that abut oceans and the Gulf of Mexico. It cannot grow in the shade. The ashes of the burnt plant are used for making glass and soap. The ashes can also be used as a cleaner for fabrics. Synonyms are prickly saltwort, windwitch.

Symbolism

Logic suggests that the symbolism of Salsola kali (Russian thistle, prickly saltwort) should be clean or cleansing. When I think of cleansing my first thought goes to when I confessed my need for a Savior and was cleansed from my sins. Wow, doing that made me feel good. I was “saved” from my sins. In my childish world view, I believed that I would not sin any more. When I did sin by disobeying my parents, thinking “bad” words, or saying mean things about people, I concluded that in reality I was not “saved.”  Being saved didn’t take with me. Perhaps I needed to do it again. Maybe I was just too awful to be saved once for all times and I needed to be saved every year or even every couple of months.

Thank God, little girls read their Bible, mature, learn.  Now, I know that I am once and for all “saved.” But this side of heaven, I am going to continue to sin. I am made up of a spiritual self that I received in the form of the Holy Spirit when I was saved. I also still have my physical or old self so I continue to sin.

God gave me a way to get rid of my continued sins. “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9, NIV). Look! Look! God is going to wash and purify us from our sins.

Reflection: Do you feel clean after a shower or bath? Do you feel clean after confessing your sins to Christ?

Copyright January 20, 2017; Carolyn A. Roth

If you want to learn more about plants in the Bible, visit www.CarolynRothMinistry.com

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Cyclamen Crown

Cyclamen persicum

The beautiful cyclamen (Cyclamen persicum) is often called Solomon’s crown. Although not identified in the Bible, cyclamen grow freely among rocks and on rock walls in Israel. It is native to the eastern Mediterranean region. During the Christmas season, cyclamens are a popular gift, possibly because they are associated with the Holy Land.

In Israel, cyclamen begin to blossom in November and continues through March-April. In Upper Galilee cyclamen bloom even into early May. Leaves are heart-shaped and dark green with white mottling. In Israel, flowers are generally white or vivid pink; however, they can also be lavender. The blossom (6-9 inches tall) rises from a single stem. The bloom can last an entire month. Flowers are reminiscent of orchids.

Growth Patterns

Generally, cyclamen grow from corms (small bulbs), but with enough patience, they can be grown from seeds. In the United States, cyclamen are winter hardy in zones 9–11. Recently, florists have developed smaller cyclamen (2-4 inch tall blossoms) that are hardy in zones 5-8.  Last fall, I purchased and planted three of the hardy cyclamen corms in St. John Church Bible Garden. I was hoping that they would grow in the spring but none of them made it through the winter..

Owners generally keep cyclamen in a cool, semi-shaded area on a porch or balcony during summer and bring them inside during winter. If cyclamen are planted outdoors, they need a semi-shaded area, composted soil, and plenty of moisture.

Reflection: The more I read about Solomon, the worse I feel about him. He had so much going for him; however, he succumbed to worship of his wives’ gods. We need to be sure that we never slowly drift (like Solomon) to worship of a god other than God.

I love Bible plants along with their symbolism. If you want to learn more about them, read my two books: 1) Rooted in God and 2) God as a Gardener. You can purchase them from my website: Carolyn Roth Ministry at http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com/

Copyright December 8, 2014, Carolyn A. Roth; all rights reserved.

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Captured by Seaweed

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Reference: Jonah 2:5

The story of Jonah is about disobedience and redemption. Most children know that Jonah disobeyed God when God told him to go to Nineveh and preach repentance to the city. Jonah didn’t want to go there, so he got on a ship bound for Tarshish in the opposite direction from Nineveh. Jonah believed that if he left the land of the Israelites, he could escape God.

A huge storm occurred in the Mediterranean Sea. Even the experienced sailors were frightened. They decided to cast lots to see who had disobeyed their god and brought the storm on them. The lot fell to Jonah. He admitted that he was disobeying God and recommended that the sailors throw him overboard. Reluctantly, the ship’s sailors threw Jonah overboard. Once Jonah was off the ship, the storm abated, and the ship proceeded on its way.

A large fish swallowed Jonah. Jonah’s prayed and called out to God while he was in the belly of the giant fish. Later Jonah wrote about the experience (Jonah chapter 2) so we read what happened to him and what he thought. Jonah described how the sea waters closed over him and sea weeds wrapped around his head.  Jonah noted that he was at the roots of the mountains in the ocean suggesting that he fell to the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea.  Jonah remained in the belly of the fish three days. Then, the fish vomited up Jonah onto dry land. (Ugh, I bet he was slimy). The land was on the eastern side of the Mediterranean Sea, not all that far from Nineveh. When Jonah went to Nineveh and preached repentance, the Ninevehites repented.

Sea Weed

The Bible referenced seaweed only once (Jonah 2:5, NIV). Although the New International Version translated the plant that wrapped around Jonah’s head as seaweed, other sources translated it as “weed” (ESV) or as “eelgrass” (Douglas & Tenney, 2011). I have a problem with the translation of eelgrass because eelgrass is generally confined to tidal water and grows out to a water depth of 35 feet.  A close reading of Jonah chapter 1 suggested that the ship Jonah was on was away from land and out into the Mediterranean Sea when the storm hit.

My research indicates that the seaweed referred to by Jonah may have been the Macrocystis pyrifera also known as brown seaweed. It is a marine alga and known as the Sequoia of the sea because it can grow 45 meters (about 147 foot) in length.  It grows in the Mediterranean Sea. The stalks are thin and readily float through the waters. It could have easily wrapped around Jonah’s neck. Currently, it is eaten as a good source of minerals.

brown-kelp

Symbolism:  Captured

Perhaps the type of plant is not as important as what it symbolized. The sea weed captured Jonah. Capture means catching, winning, or gaining control by force. Capture is exactly what the seaweed did to Jonah. He was captured so that the giant fish could swallow him.

I have been captured, or caught, by Christ and I am so glad. Now, I have to stop struggling and let God control my life.  The problem, or perhaps not so much a problem, is that God won’t control me by force. Bummer, I wish God would just “make” me do the right things. But, He doesn’t operate that way. I have to willingly give my life to Him.  That is really difficult for me to do because I have been used to controlling my own life and future.  You know:  “I am a self- made woman.” “I can do it myself.”

Reflection: What about you? Are you willing to let God capture you? Will you willing and totally yield to God?

Copyright: January 5, 2017; Carolyn A. Roth

Please visit my website for other information: www.CarolynRothMinistry.com

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Hand Me Downs

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Initially I was just going to post this cartoon by Dave Coverly. I felt sorry for Cain having to wear only a fig leaf apron. Then I got to thinking about “hand me downs.” Most of us — at least in my generation — wore hand me downs from siblings, cousins, or friends. Looking backward, that doesn’t seem optimal because it meant we were too poor to buy clothes. That was definitely true for my family — we were major poor.

But, now the idea of “hand me downs” doesn’t see all that bad. I love hand me downs in that I love the traditions that came from the apostles. Those traditions which were handed down in the New Testament church are for real. No wrapping an idea up in 21st century political correctness but the reality of Christ’s birth, crucifixion, and resurrection.

Reflection: Let’s give a shout out to the church traditions handed down from the apostles.

Copyright: January 10, 2017; Carolyn A. Roth

If would want to learn more about plants in the Bible check my website: http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com

 

 

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Jerusalem artichokes

39484220 - jerusalem artichoke, helianthus tuberosus, sunroot, sunchoke, perennial herb with elongated tobers, green alternate leaves and yellow terminal heads, tubers used as root vegetable

39484220 – jerusalem artichoke, helianthus tuberosus,

Adapted from Mortal Tree

Jerusalem artichokes (Helianthus tuberosus), we call them Sunchokes,  are not so much a stable ground cover as masterful bed builders. They don’t just block, but obliterate grass lawn, taking the place of bed building mulch  if handled correctly.

Its home is the American prairie, where it stretches for sun among massive grasses and other very competitive plants. Placing it in the standard lawn, full of short European grass species, or even an overgrown field is like releasing a saber tooth tiger into a playpen with modern house cats. It’s a brute.

It begins by pumping nutrients from deep in the soil to power billowing clouds of leaves rambling up sometimes 15ft tall stems. Every year it sends out runners. To unleash the beast, get a bucket of the tubers in fall, and with a shovel, make little slits in the ground about one foot apart, inserting the tubers deep enough they aren’t exposed, and walk away. The days of the nearby plant residents are now numbered.

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Jerusalem Artichoke sprouts

Don’t worry next spring when the tubers don’t sprout early. Jerusalem artichokes don’t like frost, and wait until late in the spring to pop up their furry little heads. I have planted these into completely unamended yards where lawn grass wasn’t even happy, but the ‘chokes still grew well. Later, in a very dry year, Jerusalem artichokes were the lushest plant in my food forest to feed my rabbit. She liked them, so I would snap off the growing tips, let the plants branch off to the side, and snap of the side branches to make rabbit happy. I started this when the plants were about 5ft tall, leaving about 4ft stems that in turn could return their nutrients to the tubers. Nevertheless the plants that normally topped ten foot came up the next year anemic, and dwarfed, barely reaching three feet.

35172408 - jerusalem artichoke flower in garden

Symbolism

As I read my friends description of Jerusalem artichokes, my reaction is that they were hearty – lived over the winter, produced when it was hot and dry.  I stay alive in cold, blustery times by hunkering down; it is like I go into hibernation. But in my hibernation, I don’t read my Bible, meditate, or pray. Usually, I watch television or read novels – not really the way to get through a rough patch is it? To paraphrase St. Paul, I do things that I don’t want to do and neglect those I should be doing. Oh wretched me, who will save me from myself?  The answer is Christ, Christ will save us from our self.

Reflection: When life is cold, tough, overwhelming and miserable, spend only 5 minutes a day not just emoting to God, but praying for His intervention in your life.

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Beauty in Aloneness

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After he had dismissed them, he went up on a mountainside by himself to pray. Later that night, he was there alone, – Matthew 14:23 (NIV)

Jesus was always connecting to his heavenly Father in prayer. The gospel accounts record that he would often be found in a lonely place praying. The pattern is pretty clear—Jesus found renewal in prayer. As Christians, why would we think any differently? We are quick to do bible studies—even studies on prayer—but do we pray? To walk in the ways of Jesus is to seek God in prayer (David Whitehead).

Reflection: If Christ needed time alone with his father, surely we do also.

Another photograph by Jim Forney.

January 5, 2016

Sourwood Tree

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The sourwood tree (Oxydendrum arboretum) is native to North America. It is one of our endemic trees that is not found on other continents unless planted. The tree has no related species. A medium-sized tree, the sourwood thrives in hardiness zones 5–9. This tree shines in summer and fall. Its midsummer flowers appear like lilies-of-the-valley, are highly fragrant, and contrast nicely against the green foliage. Then in the fall, leaves turn beautiful shades of brilliant crimson, purplish-red and sometimes yellow. And its flowers are a favorite of pollinators for honey production.

Something sour turns our stomach. Often children spit sour food out of their mouth with an “ugh.”  Although the wages of sin are often sour, accepting and following God — the real true God — is not sour.  When I was a pre-teen, I believed that Christians had no fun and their lives were sour and dour. Wow, was I ever wrong. As a more mature Christian, I know that living with and for Christ makes me radiant and joyful, not sour.

Reflection: If you are a sour, dour Christian, rethink your relationship with Christ. Consider that it might not be as right as you think it is.

Copyright December 22, 2016: Carolyn A. Roth

Check my website at http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com/

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Attention-grabbing cabbages

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For the grace of God has appeared that offers salvation to all people. It teaches us to say “No” to ungodliness and worldly passions, and to live self-controlled, upright and godly lives in this present age, while we wait for the blessed hope-the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior,.– Titus 2:11-14 (NIV)

 The supernatural outcome of seeing the power of the cross is an eagerness to do good works. We are not doing things to get God’s attention; we serve others because we HAVE God’s attention. That attention unleashes God’s grace to us that sets us on a path toward restoration and redeeming the world around us. In other words, grace will produce faith, and our faith will be seen by what we do for the betterment of those around us (David Whitehead).

Ornamental Cabbage (of all things!)

It is the middle of December and in the mountains of Virginia, very few plants  bloom. Those which do, get our attention. For the past several years, I’ve planted ornamental cabbages in the fall. They are early winter hardy and give interest to a winter garden. This year I added about 5 to our Church Bible garden. As the cold weather increases, the  tops become a more vibrant purple.

Application

As cold — stress, persecution, health problems — occur in my life, my thoughts turn to a cabbage. Under cold weather, I can die off like my zinnia blossoms or even go into hibernation like my primrose. Or I can show a more vibrant color to the world.

Cognitively, I know which option I prefer — to become more vibrant. To evidence more love and more understanding, just as Christ did under the severest stress. The only way for me to be more vibrant — like the cabbage top — is to spend time with Christ every day in my devotions.

Reflection: What helps you be become or stay vibrant? Are you getting attention from others for the right reasons?

Copyright December 16, 2013; Carolyn A. Roth, updated November 27, 2016

Please visit my website to learn about other Bible plants: http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com

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Poinsettia, Symbol of Purity

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The Poinsettia is known as a Christmas flower, but it didn’t grow in Judea at the time of Christ’s birth. Poinsettia is native to Mexico where it was a symbol of purity to Aztec Indians. Joel Roberts Poinsett introduced the flower into the United States. While Ambassador to Mexico, he had poinsettia sent to his home in Greenville, SC. He distributed the flower to botanical gardens and to friends interested in horticulture.

Today, poinsettias occur in different colors, e.g., red, pink, white. There are mini poinsettias to large specimen tree-size poinsettia. Their stems are woody and they tend to quickly drop flower petals.  The poinsettia is not only the most popular Christmas flower, but the number one flowering potted plant in the United States. My brother had a poinsettia for about 7 years. Every year it blooms around Christmas. He started to decorate it like a Christmas tree.

Every Christmas, members of my Church can donate a poinsettia to decorate the altar.  I suppose the reason is the beautiful color of the plant — I’ve never heard any discussion about the flower being symbolic of purity.  In the future when I see a poinsettia at  the  church altar, I am going to think about the purity of the Christ child who came to earth.

Reflection: If you receive a poinsettia for Christmas, enjoy it and don’t forget to think about ways you can be a pure light in a darkening world.

Copyright: December 17, 2016; Carolyn A. Roth

Please visit my website to learn about other Bible plants: http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com

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