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Cumin – Poison or spice????

Bible References: Matthew 23.1-32; Isaiah 28.24-28.

Matthew is the only gospel writer who recorded the seven “Woes” which were part of Jesus’s teaching in the Temple Courtyard during Holy Week. This day must have been difficult and exhausting for Jesus. Group after group, i.e., Sadducees, Pharisees, lawyers, teachers, and Herodians, came forward to challenge him. They attempted to trip him up so that they could condemn both his answers and him. At one point during challenges, Jesus spoke seven “Woes” in which he condemned both  Pharisees and scribes.

In the fourth “Woe,” Jesus told Pharisees and scribes that they tithe on herbs—mint, dill, and cumin; but, neglect the more important parts of the Law that have to do with justice, mercy, and faithfulness. He advised them to practice justice, mercy, and faithfulness while tithing on herbs. Notice, Jesus didn’t tell Pharisees that tithing on grown herbs was wrong. Just the opposite, Jesus reinforced the need for God’s people to tithe. At the same time, Jesus instructed listeners that loving God and seeking justice were the greater good.

When Jesus identified tithing herbs to Pharisees in Jerusalem, he named cumin (Cuminum cyminum). Cumin was closely aligned with Persian cuisine.  Jerusalemites, many who had ancestors who were returnees from the Babylonian captivity, were familiar with cumin. Ancient Greeks used cumin as a table condiment, similar to the way we use a salt shaker.

Harvesting cumin is time-consuming because it is largely done by hand when seeds turn brown. Seeds are dried, then ground. Supposedly, cumin seeds harvested in the morning are  most pungent.

Cumin is safe when eaten in foods in normal amount. In larger amounts, cumin may slow blood clotting and make bleeding disorders worse. In individuals with diabetes mellitus, cumin can lower blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Cumin consumption isn’t recommended if a woman is pregnant or is breast-feeding a child. Cumin is an essential oil; however, as an oil cumin can cause skin irritation and blisters, spasms, and seizures.

Although Jesus identified cumin in the New Testament, cumin was mentioned in the Old Testament in the Poem of the Plowman (Isaiah 28.24-28). In that poem, Isaiah said that a farmer plows soil, scatters seeds, and threshes crops. Each type of seed, i.e., barley, spelt, caraway, cumin, requires its own type of soil, sowing method, and threshing technique to get an optimal harvest. The order of these three actions comes from God. They can’t be completed in a different sequence and still obtain an optimal harvest.

As I read that God taught farmers millennia ago how to plant and harvest something as small as cumin, I wondered if today God teaches computer programmers how to write detailed software programs, scientists to extend cryogenic science, and engineers to develop nuclear propulsion engines. Isaiah would say, “Yes.” All knowledge comes from God, whether it is planting a crop or engineering a rocket.

It takes about four months to grow cumin plants. If you want the delicious taste of fresh cumin in food, the wait is worth-while. Growing as a Christian, growing in Jesus, is time-consuming. As I look backward over my life, I can see Christian growth. Importantly, I know that I can’t take credit for that growth. God taught farmers how to plant cumin, even though it has the potential to be harmful. God planted me and assists me to grow. Yes, I have the potential to be harmful; but, I also have the potential to be tasty.

Reflection: I have a jar of cumin in my spice cabinet, but rarely use it.  I also have cumin essential oil. This is the first time I realized cumin was potentially dangerous. What in your life is dangerous to your spiritual well-being that here-to-fore you never thought about? Which of your behaviors are dangerous to your country?

To learn more about Bible plants, visit my we website: http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com

Crocus in the Desert

White and purple crocus flower | GardenersPath.com

Bible Reference: Isaiah 35.1.

The Bible named both crocus and saffron, an edible spice of crocus. Currently, true crocus doesn’t grow in Israel. The flower named “crocus” that grows there has harmful effects. Here’s what the Bible says about crocus and saffron:

“Your plants are an orchard of pomegranates with choice fruits, with henna and nard, nard and saffron” (Song of Songs 4.13-14 NIV).

“The desert and the parched land will be glad; the wilderness will rejoice and blossom. Like the crocus, it will burst into bloom; it will rejoice and shout for joy” (Isaiah 35.1 NIV).

In this Song of Songs’ passage the Groom lauded his Bride by comparing her to sweet-smelling flowers and fruits. Despite the Groom’s charming description, I resonate more to Isaiah’s description of the desert blooming with crocus (plural croci). In my Bible (NIV), the title of this Isaiah chapter is “Joy of the Redeemed.” That’s me—I have been redeemed from my previous sinful, self-centered life by God. Instead of thorns, thistles, and weeds, I burst forth as a crocus blooming in the desert.

The name “crocus” is often used to describe two unrelated plants. The true crocus belongs to the iris family of plants. In Israel, another plant, colchicum (Colchicum troodi, C. tunicatum), is a crocus relative. The confusion between the true crocus and colchicum is fostered by laypersons naming colchicum as “autumn crocus.” Appendix A, Table 3 contains the differentiating characteristics of crocus and colchicum.

The true crocus includes popular spring-blooming varieties that mark winter’s end, fall-blooming species, and saffron crocus (Crocus sativum) used in cooking. The saffron crocus blooms in autumn. Saffron is an expensive spice; over 90% of saffron is produced in Iran.

Early spring saffron crocus

Several varieties of colchicum grow in Israel. The colchicum (autumn crocus) bulb contains a poison (colchicine).22 Colchicine poison symptoms include burning in the mouth and throat, fever, abdominal pain and vomiting, and ultimately kidney failure. These symptoms can progress to multiple organ failure. There isn’t a specific antidote for colchicine poison; rather, symptoms are treated, i.e., anti-emetics for nausea and vomiting and intra-venous fluids for kidney failure. If patients don’t die, recovery starts in six-to-eight days.

Reflection: Prevention of colchicine poison is better than treatment. What in your life is poisonous? More importantly, how can you not plant or nourish poison in your own life? Would increasing your service to God be valued in your community? In the USA?

Copyright 12/18/2019; Carolyn A. Roth

Please visit my website for more information on Bible plants: http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com

Rooted in God 2

Rooted in God 2

Description: Like us, plants groan under the impact of sin in the world. They wait in eager expectation for a new earth to be revealed.

Most people are unaware that the Bible mentions over 125 different plants. Yet, Holy Scriptures contain no excess information or “filler.” Every scripture is given by God’s and is valuable for instruction in holy living. Whether a fruit tree, cereal grain, or thistle, each plant has a purpose in Bible stories.

Plants had meanings in ancients’ lives, and that meaning extends to Christian lives of 21st individuals. We can learn, or perhaps refused to learn, Godly lessons from Bible plants.

Where to Purchase: www.Amazon.com or  www.CarolynRothMinistry.com.

Recommendation: This is a fun-to-read, educational book ~ a delightful surprise! Carolyn combines her vast knowledge as a Bible scholar and Master Gardener to enrich familiar Bible stories with background history as well as with fascinating facts about the often overlooked plants that are mentioned in these stories. She then adapts her plant messages to challenge the reader to examine their own life and faith. Thank you, Carolyn, for making all these unexpected connections for our benefit. – Kathy Dudley

 

Christmas Holly = Holy

 

weary-world-rejoices

It’s Christmas, it’s Christmas. Time for holly. These pictures are of the beautiful American holly tree (Ilex opaca) that grows in the southeastern United States. This one is in the St. John Church Bible Garden. It is evergreen. These pictures were taken on December 12 when the temperature is freezing at night. My friend told me that he goes out in the church garden, cuts springs from the holly trees, and uses them for garland in his home. I think that the holly tree is happy to be used in this way.

Don’t confuse this tree with the holm tree in the Bible. That tree is an evergreen oak (Quercus ilex). Both species take their name from the pointed leaves.

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If you want to grow holly trees you need a male and a female. Only the female tree produces beautiful red berries.

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A Christmas carol is The Holly and The Ivy.

Reflection: When I see, or hear, the word holly, I always think of holy. God is holy–pure, just, kind, bright–and I am not. If I were holy, I would want to be like the colors of the holly tree, e.g., vibrant, pleasing to look at, even colorful. I would want people to look at me and smile, as I do when I look at a holly tree.

I love Bible plants along with their symbolism. If you want to learn more about them, read my two books: 1) Rooted in God and 2) God as a Gardener. You can purchase them from my website: Carolyn Roth Ministry at http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com/

Copyright: December 13, 2015; Carolyn A. Roth

 

Save

Christian Superstitions

from CharGuth@aol.com

At midnight on Christmas Eve,
all water turns to wine,
cattle kneel facing toward the East,
horses kneel and blow as if to warm the manger,
animals can speak but it is bad for a human to hear them,
and the bees hum the Hundredth Psalm.

The Irish believe that the gates of heaven
open at midnight on Christmas Eve.
Those who die at that time go straight through
without having to wait in purgatory.

It is considered very lucky to be born
on Christmas Eve or Christmas day in most countries.
However, in Greece the child is feared to be
a Kallikantzaroi or a wandering spirit.
In Poland the child may turn out to be a werewolf.

The weather on each of the twelve days of Christmas
signifies what the weather will be on
the appropriate month of the coming year.

There is a game in Germany where they blindfold a goose.
The girls make a circle around the goose and whoever
it touches first will be the first to get married.

Place a branch of a cherry tree in water
at the beginning of advent.
It will bring luck if it flowers by Christmas.

You should burn your old shoes during
the Christmas season in Greece
to prevent misfortunes in the coming year.

It is bad luck to let any fire go out
in your house during the Christmas season.
The fire in your fireplace must continue to burn
for the twelve days of Christmas.

If you do not eat plum pudding during the season,
you will have bad luck for a year.

If you refuse mince pie at Christmas dinner,
you will have bad luck for a year.

A loaf of bread left on the table
after Christmas Eve dinner will ensure
no lack of bread for the next year.

If an apple is eaten at midnight on Christmas Eve,
good health will follow for a year.

Tie wet bands of straw around fruit trees
to make them fruitful, or tie a stone
to a branch on Christmas Eve.

Nothing sown on Christmas Eve will perish,
even if the seed is sown in the snow.

In the Netherlands they take a fir stick and
thrust it into the fire and let it burn partially.
They put it under the bed.
This serves as lightening protection.

Never launder a Christmas present
before giving it to its recipient
as this takes out the good luck.

Time To Order Christmas Gifts

Is giving a book — a Christian book — part of your plans? Now is the time or order one (or more) at the lowest rate possible. Go to http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com and purchase one (or more) of the following:

Impatiens

Impatiens are great bedding and container flowers that ought to bloom reliably all summer long. They’re an old standby for bright, full color.
Of all the possible reasons impatiens are not blooming, one of the most common is improper sun exposure. Impatiens plants bloom best with some shade, a requirement that often leads to misunderstanding.
While some impatiens bloom well in full shade, for the most part they’ll perform better with at least some sun. On the other hand, too much sun will cut down on blooming, too. Avoid planting your impatiens in full sun.
If you have them in full shade and they’re not blooming well, try moving them to a spot that gets a few hours of good afternoon sun exposure.
Another common cause of no flowers on impatiens is improper watering. If the roots of impatiens plants get waterlogged, the flowers will tend to drop off and the foliage will take on a red tinge. If you see this, cut back on your watering. Don’t cut back too far, though. You never want your soil to dry out completely.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Impatiens Won’t Bloom: Reasons For No Flowers On Impatiens Plant https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/impatiens/no-flowers-on-impatiens-plant.htm

Consequences of Sin

Book Description: Disobedience has consequences. When ancient Israelites disobeyed God’s statutes, their land was overrun by foreign enemies. They were exiled from their homeland. Prophets attempted to warn them what was going to occur; however, both kings and commoners ignored warnings. Disobedience to God’s laws wasn’t confined to Israelites 2000-3000 years ago. Americans ignore God’s laws and commit the same sins as ancient Israelites, i.e., idolatry, burglary, slavery.  I don’t think that God has one standard and one outcome for Israelites and another for us. This book uses plants to point out the sins of ancient Israel just like ancient prophets used plants to make their point.

What People are Saying:

Dr. Roth tackles this elusive topic courageously confronting the plants most gardeners dread. The result? She rewards curiosity with much to ponder, turning the thorns, thistles, briers, and cohorts into a poignant prickling of conscious and deeper dig into God’s word.” Shelley S. Cramm, God’s Word for Gardeners, NIV Bible

“What a book! Whoever would have thought that meaningful Biblical instruction could be found by examining plant life. Leave it to Dr. Carolyn Roth to research this easily overlooked aspect of biblical teaching and bring to light numerous lessons of Godly living. If you are looking for a truly innovative and interesting way to gain spiritual insight, this book is it.”  John Domalski, Lay Minister, St. John Lutheran Church, Roanoke, VA

Can be purchased on Amazon as a paperback or electronic copy or as a paperback at http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com

 

Red Geraniums

The mention of geraniums typically conjures up images of bright red blooms against rich green foliage adorning window boxes and porch railings. You may be surprised to learn that there are hundreds of species of geraniums that range in size, shape and color. The common geranium comes in shades of white, red and pink with many striking bi-colors, too.

What Does the Geranium Flower Mean?

The geranium flower appears to have some conflicting meanings, which means you must rely on both the circumstances and their color to refine their meaning. Some of the most common meanings are:

  • Folly or Stupidity
  • Gentility
  • Ingenuity
  • Melancholy
  • Bridal Favor
  • Unexpected Meeting
  • Expected Meeting
  • Preference
  • True Friendship

Bachelor’s in the Bible

This is a flower grown from seeds on my back porch. It is called a Bachelor’s button (Centaurea cyanus) and cornflower. Although it grows in Europe and the United States, I am not sure if it ever grew in the Middle East. Its colors are purple, blue, and pink.

I have been attempting to name bachelor’s in the Bible. In the Old Testament, Abel may have been a bachelor. Definitely, Jeremiah was a bachelor.

In the New Testament: Jesus was a bachelor as was John the Baptist. Can you think of any other Bible characters who were bachelors?

Bachelor men and women contributed to the spread of Christ’s kingdom.

Reflection: If God has called you to an unmarried state in life, identify ways that you can honor God in your bachelorhood.

Copyright July 30, 2019; Carolyn A. Roth