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Carolyn Roth Ministry October 2018 Newsletter

Please read the October Newsletter for Carolyn Roth Ministry.

https://www.carolynrothministry.com/uploads/8/1/1/7/81173938/volume_2_issue_10_oct18.pdf

September newsletter

To read my latest newsletter, click the link below.

http://www.carolynrothministry.com/uploads/8/1/1/7/81173938/volume_2_2c_issue_9.pdf

August Newsletter

If you click on the link you will be able to read Carolyn Roth Ministry Newsletter for August.

Volume 2, Issue 8.pub

Good News in Nature

Good News in Nature centers on plants in the 4 Gospels. With few exceptions, the plants are ones that Jesus used in his ministry. At this time, it is available on Amazon/Kindle in electronic format.

Need your Help

Colleagues,

If you didn’t have a familiarity with plants, you would not be enrolled to receive my blog. I need a favor:  Would you please send me an email (carolynrothministry@gmail.com) naming the top 10 plants that you believe influenced/swayed/impacted Christian thought?

Thank you in advance for considering this question and answering it.

Carolyn

June 2018, Newsletter

Here is the link for CarolynRothMinistry, June Newsletter — https://mailchi.mp/aa537940e0b6/check-out-new-june-special

Robust and Harsh Tolerant

Beard's tongueThis attractive perennial is semi-evergreen and has digitalis plant-like white flowers. Flowers bloom April – June

Described as robust and harsh-tolerant, it grows in wide open prairies, fields, along wood margins, etc. It is native to Canada and the entire eastern U.S. seaboard. This one grew in the Hershey, PA garden.

Penstemon digitalis is commonly called Husker red and beard tongue. I understand the red designation, however, don’t know where the beard tongue came from.

After all that Jesus went through — long days of teaching, heat and sweat, challenges from the religious elite who were supposedly looking for his coming — He can be described as harsh-tolerant. Probably the individuals who know me best, would never term me “harsh tolerant.”  When adversity strikes, my default is to whine. Often, my behavior embarrasses even me.

Reflection: How do you respond to harshness, i.e., criticism, high humidity heat, lack of safety and security? Compare and contrast your behavior with Christ’s behavior.

April Carolyn Roth Ministry Newsletter

Above is my latest book:  Connecting the Church Calendar.  Click on the link below to read more information about this unique book.

http://www.carolynrothministry.com/uploads/8/1/1/7/81173938/roth_newsletter_april_2018.pdf

Camel Thorn, Persian Manna

References: Although there are no references to the plant “camel thorn” in the Bible as today’s Christians have a copy, Goodspeed substitutes “camel thorn” in a Ecclesiastes reference.

Camel thorn (Alhagi maurorum) is a type of legume native to the Mediterranean Sea Basin, extending into Russia. It has been introduced into Australia, southern Africa and western United States. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, currently, camel thorn does not grow east of the Mississippi River. In western United States, camel thorn is often identified as an invasive species.

At the same time, the flower is beautiful: a small, bright pink to maroon pea flowers and small legume pods.  In Israel, flowers bloom April – September, indicating that camel thorn is hardy because it grows in the heat of Israeli summers. Pilgrims to Israel will see if growing in woodlands, shrublands, steppe, and even into the desert. Because camel thorn appreciates a salty habitat, it can grow on the seashore. It grows best next to a source of water, such as an irrigation ditch.

Pods are brown or reddish and seeds are mottled brown beans. Camel thorn is a perennial with a massive rhizome system which may extend over six feet into the ground. New shoots can appear over 20 feet from the parent plant. Above the ground, the plant rarely reaches four feet in height. It is a heavily branched, gray-green thicket with long spines along the branches.

Uses: In folk medicine camel thorn has been used to treat glandular tumors, nasal polyps, and ailments related to the bile ducts. It is used as a medicinal herb for its gastroprotective, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant, laxative, anti-diarrhal and antiseptic properties, and in the treatment of rheumatism and hemorrhoids. I am not sure which parts of the plant are used in these treatments; however, I would be reluctant to take appreciable amounts internally. In the other hand, in the Qur’an, camel thorn is identified as a source of  sweet Manna, thus has been used as sweetener. Animals cannot forage eat the plant despite its ready invasion of grazing land. Despite being named after the camel, camels do not normally forage on this plant.

Reflection: Not all plants God put on earth can be used for food for either man nor animals. Do you ever wonder why God put them on earth? Perhaps, originally a plant such as camel thorn had a good used but with Adam and Eve’s sin, it was also corrupted. Saint Paul wrote that even creation groans under the weight of man’s sins.

Copyright: February 20, 2018; Carolyn Adams Roth

Visit my blog to learn more about plants: http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com

Christmas Holly = Holy

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It’s Christmas, it’s Christmas. Time for holly. These pictures are of the beautiful American holly tree (Ilex opaca) that grows in southeastern United States. This one is in the St. John Church Bible Garden. It is evergreen. These picture were taken on December 12 when the temperature is freezing at night. My friend told me that he goes out in the church garden, cuts springs from the holly trees there, and uses them for garland in his home. I think that this holly tree is happy to be used in this way.

Don’t confuse this tree with the holm tree in the Bible. That tree is an evergreen oak (Quercus ilex). Both species take their name from the pointed leaves.

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If you want to grow holly trees you need a male and a female. Only the female tree produces the beautiful red berries.

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A Christmas carol is The Holly and The Ivy.

Reflection: When I see, or hear, the word holly, I always think of holy. God is holy–pure, just, kind, bright–and I am not. If I were holy, I would want to be like the colors of the holly tree, e.g., vibrant, pleasing to look at, even colorful. I would want people to look at me and smile, as I do when I look at a holly tree.

I love Bible plants along with their symbolism. If you want to learn more about them, read my two books: 1) Rooted in God and 2) God as a Gardener. You can purchase them from my website: Carolyn Roth Ministry at http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com/

Copyright: December 13, 2015; Carolyn A. Roth

 

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