What is Epiphany Season

Although some churches celebrate Epiphany on the Sunday nearest January 6, Epiphany Day occurs on January 6, or 12 days after the birth of Jesus (December 25). The Epiphany season (Epiphantide) extends from January 6 to the start of Lent on Ash Wednesday. It encompasses six-to-eight Sundays depending on the date of Easter. In some churches, these Sundays are named Ordinary Time; however, better labels are the First Sunday of Epiphany, Second Sunday of Epiphany, etc. The feast of Epiphany originated in the Eastern Church and reflects the mystical thinking in Eastern Christian churches, to include the weaving and reweaving of themes in celebrations.

Epiphany Day (January 6) ends the Christmas season. The Epiphany season is time to lift our eyes from gifts, parties, and Christmas trees. In Epiphany, we imagine the faith it took for Magi (wise men) to follow a star up to one thousand miles. Their journey was hazardous. Most people they encountered couldn’t see this “so called” star they followed. At almost every stop or town along the way, the wise men were ridiculed when they told local people that they followed a star which was leading them to a new-born king.

During Epiphany, we focus on our own faith. As we reach out to others with the good news of Jesus, we modern day “wise men” must be ready for physical hazards, laughter, and incredulity. Still, as the wise men kept going from their home in the East to Bethlehem, we too must keep reaching out with our belief in Jesus and his redemptive work that began when he was born in Bethlehem of Judah in the days of Herod, the King. The four main concepts of Epiphany10 are:

Divine Manifestation. Epiphany is a Greek word epiphania, which means “a god visited earth.”  Twelve days before the start of Epiphany, God came to earth as the baby Jesus. Jesus’ birth was the first incarnate manifestation of God the Son to humankind, but not his last manifestation. At the end of the ages, Jesus will again walk the earth. In this final manifestation, Jesus will bring with him an army of angels.

Royal Kingship. God’s son, the baby Jesus, was a manifestation of the greatest king that ever lived. At Christmas, Jesus was shown to Jews. At Epiphany, he was shown to Gentiles. At the end of the ages, when Jesus returns in all his majesty, the designation Jew and Gentile will be irrelevant. At that time, Jesus, the king of kings, will separate the righteous from the unrighteous regardless of whether the individual is of Jewish or Gentile heritage.

Light. The third theme that runs through the Epiphany season is light. During the Advent season, the world was in darkness. Christians prayed and waited for the coming birth of Messiah and his second coming in judgment. At Christmas, the Light broke forth; but, was seen only by Mary, Joseph, and the shepherds. At Epiphany, the mysterious star summoned Gentiles to benefit from the work of God’s son. The prophecy is fulfilled: “The nations shall come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your rising” (Isaiah 60:3 ESV).

The royal nuptials. Marriage, or nuptials, is the final theme in the Epiphany season. Two thousand years ago God’s son married into humanity. Christ is the bridegroom and the Church his bride. Jesus’s celebration of the marriage feast at Cana is symbolic of Jesus’ marriage to the Church. The wise-men from a far-off Gentile country hurried to the wedding feast with royal wedding gifts, gold, frankincense, and myrrh.

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