Cumin – Poison or spice????

Bible References: Matthew 23.1-32; Isaiah 28.24-28.

Matthew is the only gospel writer who recorded the seven “Woes” which were part of Jesus’s teaching in the Temple Courtyard during Holy Week. This day must have been difficult and exhausting for Jesus. Group after group, i.e., Sadducees, Pharisees, lawyers, teachers, and Herodians, came forward to challenge him. They attempted to trip him up so that they could condemn both his answers and him. At one point during challenges, Jesus spoke seven “Woes” in which he condemned both  Pharisees and scribes.

In the fourth “Woe,” Jesus told Pharisees and scribes that they tithe on herbs—mint, dill, and cumin; but, neglect the more important parts of the Law that have to do with justice, mercy, and faithfulness. He advised them to practice justice, mercy, and faithfulness while tithing on herbs. Notice, Jesus didn’t tell Pharisees that tithing on grown herbs was wrong. Just the opposite, Jesus reinforced the need for God’s people to tithe. At the same time, Jesus instructed listeners that loving God and seeking justice were the greater good.

When Jesus identified tithing herbs to Pharisees in Jerusalem, he named cumin (Cuminum cyminum). Cumin was closely aligned with Persian cuisine.  Jerusalemites, many who had ancestors who were returnees from the Babylonian captivity, were familiar with cumin. Ancient Greeks used cumin as a table condiment, similar to the way we use a salt shaker.

Harvesting cumin is time-consuming because it is largely done by hand when seeds turn brown. Seeds are dried, then ground. Supposedly, cumin seeds harvested in the morning are  most pungent.

Cumin is safe when eaten in foods in normal amount. In larger amounts, cumin may slow blood clotting and make bleeding disorders worse. In individuals with diabetes mellitus, cumin can lower blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Cumin consumption isn’t recommended if a woman is pregnant or is breast-feeding a child. Cumin is an essential oil; however, as an oil cumin can cause skin irritation and blisters, spasms, and seizures.

Although Jesus identified cumin in the New Testament, cumin was mentioned in the Old Testament in the Poem of the Plowman (Isaiah 28.24-28). In that poem, Isaiah said that a farmer plows soil, scatters seeds, and threshes crops. Each type of seed, i.e., barley, spelt, caraway, cumin, requires its own type of soil, sowing method, and threshing technique to get an optimal harvest. The order of these three actions comes from God. They can’t be completed in a different sequence and still obtain an optimal harvest.

As I read that God taught farmers millennia ago how to plant and harvest something as small as cumin, I wondered if today God teaches computer programmers how to write detailed software programs, scientists to extend cryogenic science, and engineers to develop nuclear propulsion engines. Isaiah would say, “Yes.” All knowledge comes from God, whether it is planting a crop or engineering a rocket.

It takes about four months to grow cumin plants. If you want the delicious taste of fresh cumin in food, the wait is worth-while. Growing as a Christian, growing in Jesus, is time-consuming. As I look backward over my life, I can see Christian growth. Importantly, I know that I can’t take credit for that growth. God taught farmers how to plant cumin, even though it has the potential to be harmful. God planted me and assists me to grow. Yes, I have the potential to be harmful; but, I also have the potential to be tasty.

Reflection: I have a jar of cumin in my spice cabinet, but rarely use it.  I also have cumin essential oil. This is the first time I realized cumin was potentially dangerous. What in your life is dangerous to your spiritual well-being that here-to-fore you never thought about? Which of your behaviors are dangerous to your country?

To learn more about Bible plants, visit my we website: http://www.CarolynRothMinistry.com

One response to “Cumin – Poison or spice????

  1. Hi Carolyn.
    If Cumin is a blood thinner and lowers blood glucosd\e levels, wouldn’t it be great if physicians learned how to use God’s farmacy instead of warfarin and metformin?
    No $$ in that I guess.
    Thank you for your work.

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