Living by God’s Rules

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Bible Reference:  Isaiah 28:24-29

The parable of the plowman is a two stanza poem. The first stanza focuses on plowing the ground for planting and the second on threshing a crop. The poem ends with praise to God and the interpretation is unfolded. Although Isaiah lived most of his life in Jerusalem, the content of Isaiah’s book demonstrates a sure knowledge of ways crops were planted, cultivated, and harvested.

The immediate context for the parable of the plowman begins in Isaiah chapter 28, verse 9. The country’s leaders mocked Isaiah; but, more importantly they mocked God. The leaders asked: Who is God to try to teach us? Are we babies? Are we newly weaned children? No! They were adults and didn’t need detailed instructions from God, i.e., “Do and do, do and do, rule on rule, rule on rule, a little here, a little there” (Isaiah 28:10 NIV). The rulers in Jerusalem boasted they entered a covenant with death and the grave; thus, when a foreign nation invaded them, they wouldn’t be touched (Isaiah 28:14-15).

According to Isaiah, reality for both Israel and Judah will be different. Neither country is prepared militarily or spiritually for foreign invasion, an invasion that God will allow in judgment for their rejection of him and his laws. In order to achieve security for their land, citizens had to recognize and abide by God’s rules. Unfortunately, in Israel and Judah both leaders and citizens rejected God and God’s requirements for national and personal holiness. There was little, if any, justice in either Israel or Judah. Kings and leaders, insulated by their wealth, had almost no understanding of the everyday lives of the poor in their nations.

caraway-seeds

Caraway Seeds

In The parable of the plowman, two herbs were named, caraway and cumin. Caraway is highlighted in this entry. The caraway plant (Carum carvi) is an herbaceous biennial that is only about eight inches tall in year one. Foliage is carrot-like. In the second year, caraway plants triple their size, i.e., about 30 inches tall. Stems are thick and foliage is feathery.  Tiny white flowers appear on the umbels. Flowering begins in May and can last all summer. Dry flowers yield small hard brown seeds– the caraway spice.

Symbolism: Maturity

The result of the sins of Israel and Judah was God’s judgement on each nation and its people. Just like it takes two years for caraway to yield a crop of caraway seeds, so did it take a while for both the Northern and Southern kingdoms to mature in their sin. At any time in this process if God would have seen national repentance he would have forgiven and people and healed it.

In the United States, we will shortly elect a new president. I hear so much rhetoric about the short-comings of each candidate. I don’t hear anything about national repentance.  I don’t hear any reflection on how our country is maturing in its sinfulness; yet, year after year our personal and national sin becomes worse. At the same time, fewer and fewer voices speak out about national sin.

Reflection: Would you say that we in the United States have national sin as the Northern and Southern kingdoms of Israel had national sins. If you said “yes,” what should you be doing about them?

If you want to get more information on plants in the Bible, please see my website: www.CarolynRothMinistry.com.

Copyright: July 31, 2016; Carolyn A. Roth

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One response to “Living by God’s Rules

  1. The U S in for quite unpleasant circumstances if this nation doesn’t turn back to God. That doesn’t seem very likely as so many of its people are blatantly transgressing God’s laws.

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